Program Schedule

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Keynote Speaker

Time:
10:00-10:30

Title: : Vibration Analysis Leading into Diagnosis (Valid) Approach

Jyoti K Sinha
The University of Manchester, UK

Biography

Dr Jyoti K. Sinha is Programme Director, Reliability Engineering and Asset Management (REAM) MSc and Head, Dynamics Laboratory, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, UK.Dr Sinha has been extensively involved in many industrial projects (nearly Ł3M) related to Vibration-based Condition Monitoring and Maintenance of Machines and Structures in last 27 years. Dr Sinha is the author of more than 225 publications (Journals, conferences, books, edited book/conference proceedings and technical reports) and gave a number of keynote/invited lectures. Dr Sinha is the associate editor of two international journals and the editorial board member of two journals. Dr Sinha has started a series of an International Conference of Maintenance Engineering (Income) and the Journal of Maintenance Engineering (JoME) from August 2016. He is also technical committee member of IFTOMM Rotordynamics. Recently he is appointed as the British Standard Institute (BSI) Member and involved in reviewing ISO codes related to Machine Vibration.

Abstract

Vibration-based Condition Monitoring (VCM) is generally used in industries to predict fault(s) at early stage in any machine so that the maintenance can be performed before any catastrophic failure. However the question always arises whether the VCM alone in a machine is enough? Answer is generally yes if the failure is not frequent and premature. But if the failure is premature and frequent then the experience shows that the routine VCM alone may not be sufficient. For such cases, it is observed that the dynamics of the complete machine unit comprises of the rotor, bearings and foundation is responsible for such premature and frequent failure. Hence additional tests and analysis are required to understand the machine dynamic behavior which can then leads to solution. The topic will discuss few industrial case studies to show the usefulness of valid approach.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
10:30-11:00

Title: Performance Evaluation of Swell Packers under Actual Field Conditions

Sayyad Zahid Qamar
Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Biography

Prof Sayyad Zahid Qamar is currently associated with the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. He has worked both as a university academician and a researcher, and as a field engineer (mechanical), during his twenty-five years of professional service. His main research areas are applied materials and manufacturing; applied mechanics and design; Reliability engineering; and engineering education. He has worked on different funded projects in excess of 4 million US dollars. He is the author of one research monograph (book), two book chapters, over 120 publications in refereed international journals and conferences, and 31 technical reports. He has also edited two technical book volumes, and is serving on the editorial boards of various well-known research journals. He has conducted experimental, numerical, analytical, and stochastic studies in the areas of Swelling and inert elastomers; Solid expandable tubulars; Metal forming process, product, and tooling; etc.

Abstract

Swelling elastomers are a relatively recent breed of advanced polymers, known for their self-healing and large stretch when in contact with certain fluids. They undergo dynamic swelling when exposed to water or oil. They have found extensive use as sealing elements and swell-packers in different petroleum drilling and development operations. Swellable elastomer packers (SEP) consist of swelling elastomer sections bonded to petroleum pipes. Many mature fields (which account for more than two-thirds of the world’s oil and gas production) have been traditionally abandoned after serious production declines, because of the difficulties and large cost associated with rework. Swell packers have now been successfully employed for workovers, sidetracks, and redrills, putting abandoned wells back into production. When oilfields are producing substantial amounts of unwanted water or gas, increased recovery from maturing reservoirs is possible through shut-off of unwanted water and gas by the deployment of swelling elastomer sections to segment horizontal wells. Swellable elastomers have also been successfully used for cementless completions, for well completion together with cement jobs, and for zonal isolation in openhole completion of foam-drilled horizontal wells. No studies have been reported about the long-term durability or expected service life of swell packers under actual well conditions. A full-scale test rig has been designed, constructed, and commissioned at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), Muscat, Oman for five-year long in-situ evaluation of various types of swell packers. This longevity testing of water-swelling and oil-swelling elastomer packers of different sizers is being carried out in partnership with a regional petroleum development company. These packers consist of different types of water-swelling and oil-swelling materials, and are exposed to actual crude oil or brine solutions of different salinities, and are tested at both room and higher temperatures. High differential pressures are applied on selected packers once they have sealed. Elastomer types, swelling media, test temperatures and pressures, all represent actual field conditions in regional oil well.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
11:15-11:45

Title: Use of polyurea as a protective coating: New applications of polymers in damage mitigation

Damith Mohotti
University of Sydney, Australia

Biography

Dr Mohotti has developed expertise in many interrelated areas in structural and materials engineering including extreme loadings on structures (blast and impact), wind loadings on buildings and development of smart materials. He is considered as an expert in advanced numerical simulations with his immense contribution to the development of this sector. In addition to his expertise as a researcher he has gained worthy of experience working as a structural engineer and a consultant. Dr. Damith is currently working as a lecturer in the School of Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Engineering and IT at University of Sydney. He currently works as a member of the industrial engagement committee of the school and hold the responsibility of delivering three key units of studies on design of concrete and pre-stressed concrete structures.

Abstract

The economical and technical values of elastomers in many different industrial applications are still under estimated. Over the last few decades, many researchers have investigated the use of elastomers such as polyurea as a protective coating material due to its ability to absorb a considerably high amount of energy compared to most other similar coating materials. Polyurea uses byproducts of petroleum industry and has been identified as a good candidate material to use as a protective coating or an energy absorber. In recent years, researchers have drawn their attention towards the application of polyuria to enhance the resistance of structures and systems against extreme impulsive loadings such as blasts. With adequate surface preparation, polyurea bonds well with most structural materials (such as concrete, steel and aluminium), thereby forming composite behaviour. It can be used either as the outer face of a structure, or as an interlayer material, by utilising its compressive or tensile properties depending upon the nature of the load transmitted. Due to the complex nature of its microstructure, polyuria shows a high level of stress–strain non-linearity, rate sensitivity, and a high degree of pressure dependency compared to other elastomeric materials. In addition, polyurea has a higher energy density than most other elastomeric materials. In recent years, a spray-in-place methodology has been introduced for polyuria coating, which has increased its usage in many industrial applications such as tank liners, manhole and tunnel coatings, and secondary coatings on bridges, roofs and parking decks. Recent studies show that it also possesses the desired characteristics for effective protective coating application against blast and ballistic loadings in both vehicles and ground structures. In this presentation, some previous research projects done on polyuria applications on damage mitigation will be reviewed. Also new technological developments possible in polymer industry with their economical benefits will be discussed.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
11:45-12:15

Title: Fueling Our Future

Kuo-Wei Huang
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia

Biography

KAUST Catalysis Center and Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia. Kuo-Wei Huang obtained his B.S. from National Taiwan University as a Dr. Yuan T. Lee Fellow and his Ph.D. from Stanford University as a Regina Casper Fellow. He is currently Associate Professor of Chemical Sciences at KAUST. Prior to joining KAUST, he was Assistant Professor at the National University of Singapore and a Goldhaber Distinguished Fellow at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He has co-authored over 170 publications with an H-Index of 37. His research interests include renewable energy and synthetic and mechanistic studies of small-molecule activation.

Abstract

The efficient and safe decomposition of formic acid as a promising energy carrier has become increasingly important. We have developed ruthenium based catalysts containing unique ligands for the selective decomposition of formic acid to H2 and CO2 in water in the absence of any organic additives. A turnover frequency (TOF) up to 12,000 h-1 and a turnover number (TON) of 350,000~1,100,000 at 90 °C were achieved. Efficient production of high-pressure gas of 24.0 MPa (3480 psi) without the formation of CO, was demonstrated. A prototype model car was built.

Sessions:
Petroleum Engineering, Geology and Geoscience & Petrochemistry and Polymer & Drilling and Mining Engineering & Chemical Engineering

Time:
12:15-12:40

Title: Numerical simulation of water flooding in natural fractured reservoirs under Poro-elastic conditions

Reda Abdel Azim
American University of Ras Al Khaimah, UAE

Biography

Dr. Reda Rabiee Abdel Azim holds his PhD from the University of New South Wales, Australia 2015, M.Sc. and B.Sc. from University of Cairo, Egypt in 2005 and 2010 respectively, all in Petroleum Engineering. Prior joining American University of Ras Al Khaimah as an assistant professor and chemical and petroleum engineering department chair, Dr. Reda Abdel Azim worked with Schlumberger and Technical Petroleum Services Companies.

Abstract

A numerical method is employed to investigate the fluid flowing dynamics in fractured reservoirs in this paper. This paper proposes a combination of discrete fracture network model (DFN) and single continuum model for effective permeability tensors, which is used to simulate the flow in fractured reservoirs with multi-scale fractures and proved feasible. In the first part of the paper, implicit flow equations of oil and water phase in both fractures and matrix are established to consider the non-linearity of oil and water properties which depend on pressure. Then the finite element method based on the unstructured grid system an Newton Raphson iteration are used to obtain the numerical solution. Moreover, the accuracy of this simulator is proved through synthetic cases. The proposed method is applied on a part of producing fractured basement hydrocarbon reservoirs in India. The results show that the existences of complex fracture networks have great impacts on water flooding. Compared with the homogeneous reservoir, natural fracture (micro and large scale) networks can change the direction and velocity of the water front, which finally leads to the more serious water break through, higher water-cut and less recovery.

Time:
13:45-14:10

Title: Concept of System Safety for Petrochemical Industries

H Baran Akinbingol
Ministry of Labour and Social Security, TURKEY

Biography

Huseyin Baran AkinbinGol is presently working at Board of Labour Inspection at Ministry of Labour and Social Security (TURKEY) from the year 2010, as a senior labour inspector especially in the fields of inspection of chemical industries and safety reports, according to process safety, control of major accidents (COMAH/Seveso) directive, and other legislations. He graduates from Gazi University, with bachelor degrees chemical engineering (2004) and business administration (2013). Worked before at Crude Oil Pipeline Construction project (2004), Plant Construction (2006-2008) and Bureau Veritas (2008-2010) as an industrial inspector with the capabilities of safety (Occupational Safety Expert), welding engineering (International Institute of Welding) and painting (Training within Industry & British Gas), non destructive inspection (Middle East Technical University). He got masters degree in the fields of energy and catalyst at the Department of Advanced Technologies (2011) and presently he is also researcher at Gazi University as a doctoral thesis subject in the fields of petrochemical industry for risk based inspection (RBI) and methodology API 580/581 since 2013.

Abstract

Despite the progressive developments in industrial control and detections systems, researches of standards, risk management techniques, usage of accident databases, diffusion of new innovations such as virtual reality applications, the safety level of the companies is still insufficient and major accidents are still happening. To improve the safety level of the companies the experiences, know ledges such as the application of technology, compliance with the design standards, the safety management system should be reviewed and false facts should be revealed. Through these conditions development of a new system is necessary to improve safety level of companies totally. In this study, the main factors such as misunderstandings of the standards, innovation and software capabilities, compliance with international legal regulations, management systems which are effecting of safety level is discussed with the inspection results of last accidents, recent applications and know ledges. Consequently, special proposals are prepared for the Petrochemical Industries in the concept of system safety.

Time:
14:10-14:35

Title: Performance Evaluation of Swell Packers under Actual Field Conditions

Sayyad Zahid Qamar
Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Biography

Sayyad Zahid Qamar is currently associated with the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. He has worked both as a university academician and a researcher, and as a field engineer (mechanical), during his twenty-five years of professional service. His main research areas are applied materials and manufacturing; applied mechanics and design; Reliability engineering; and Engineering education. He has worked on different funded projects in excess of 4 million US dollars. He is the author of one research monograph (book), two book chapters, over 120 publications in refereed international journals and conferences, and 31 technical reports. He has also edited two technical book volumes, and is serving on the editorial boards of various well-known research journals. He has conducted experimental, numerical, analytical, and stochastic studies in the areas of Swelling and inert elastomers; Solid expandable tubulars; Metalforming process, product, and tooling; etc.

Abstract

Swelling elastomers are a relatively recent breed of advanced polymers, known for their self-healing and large stretch when in contact with certain fluids. They undergo dynamic swelling when exposed to water or oil. They have found extensive use as sealing elements and swell-packers in different petroleum drilling and development operations. Swellable elastomer packers (SEP) consist of swelling elastomer sections bonded to petroleum pipes. Many mature fields (which account for more than two-thirds of the world’s oil and gas production) have been traditionally abandoned after serious production declines, because of the difficulties and large cost associated with rework. Swell packers have now been successfully employed for workovers, sidetracks, and redrills, putting abandoned wells back into production. When oilfields are producing substantial amounts of unwanted water or gas, increased recovery from maturing reservoirs is possible through shut-off of unwanted water and gas by the deployment of swelling elastomer sections to segment horizontal wells. Swellable elastomers have also been successfully used for cementless completions, for well completion together with cement jobs, and for zonal isolation in openhole completion of foam-drilled horizontal wells. No studies have been reported about the long-term durability or expected service life of swell packers under actual well conditions. A full-scale test rig has been designed, constructed, and commissioned at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), Muscat, Oman for five-year long in-situ evaluation of various types of swell packers. This longevity testing of water-swelling and oil-swelling elastomer packers of different sizers is being carried out in partnership with a regional petroleum development company. These packers consist of different types of water-swelling and oil-swelling materials, and are exposed to actual crude oil or brine solutions of different salinities, and are tested at both room and higher temperatures. High differential pressures are applied on selected packers once they have sealed. Elastomer types, swelling media, test temperatures and pressures, all represent actual field conditions in regional oil wells.

Time:
14:35-15:00

Title: Vibration Analysis Leading into Diagnosis (Valid) Approach

Jyoti K Sinha
The University of Manchester, UK

Biography

Dr Jyoti K. Sinha, BSc (Mech), M Tech (Aero), PhD, CEng, FIMechE Dr Jyoti K. Sinha is Programme Director, Reliability Engineering and Asset Management (REAM) MSc and Head, Dynamics Laboratory, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, UK.Dr Sinha has been extensively involved in many industrial projects (nearly 3M) related to Vibration-based Condition Monitoring and Maintenance of Machines and Structures in last 27 years. Dr Sinha is the author of more than 225 publications (Journals, conferences, books, edited book/conference proceedings and technical reports) and gave a number of keynote/invited lectures. Dr Sinha is the associate editor of two international journals and the editorial board member of two journals.Dr Sinha has started a series of an International Conference of Maintenance Engineering (Income) and the Journal of Maintenance Engineering (JoME) from August 2016. He is also technical committee member of IFTOMM Rotordynamics. Recently he is appointed as the British Standard Institute (BSI) Member and involved in reviewing ISO codes related to Machine Vibration.

Abstract

Vibration-based Condition Monitoring (VCM) is generally used in industries to predict fault(s) at early stage in any machine so that the maintenance can be performed before any catastrophic failure. However the question always arises whether the VCM alone in a machine is enough? Answer is generally yes if the failure is not frequent and premature. But if the failure is premature and frequent then the experience shows that the routine VCM alone may not be sufficient. For such cases, it is observed that the dynamics of the complete machine unit comprises of the rotor, bearings and foundation is responsible for such premature and frequent failure. Hence additional tests and analysis are required to understand the machine dynamic behavior which can then leads to solution. The topic will discuss few industrial case studies to show the usefulness of valid approach.

Time:
15:00-15:25

Title: Novel Metal-Organic Framework Membranes for Separation of hydrocarbon Mixtures

Zhiping Lai
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia

Biography

Professor Lai's research interests mainly focus on synthesis, characterization, and applications of inorganic membranes with ordered porous structures, such as zeolites, mesoporous silica or carbon, metal-organic frameworks, etc. The aim of his research is to understand the membrane formation and separation mechanisms in order to develop novel synthesis strategies to fabricate high performance membrane systems. The applications of these membranes are targeted on gas separations, hydrocarbon mixture separations, membrane reactors, wastewater treatment, and recovery of industrial organic solvents. Lai is also interested in coupling of inorganic and polymeric materials to develop novel mixed matrix membranes. Another area of his interests is synthesis of porous materials into nanostructures such as core-shell nanostructure and study their potential applications such as drug deliveries and micro-membrane reactors.

Abstract

It is estimated that separation processes account for almost 40% of total energy consumed in petrochemical industry. Membrane technology as an efficiency separation method in many cases can save up to 80% energy compared to conventional technologies such as distillation, adsorption and adsorption, etc. Furthermore, membrane technology has many other advantages such as zero discharge, small footprint, each to scale up, and easy to operate, etc. Hence, it is expected that membrane technology will play a more and more important role in the future. In academic, it is current one of the hottest research topics in chemical Engineering. Development of novel membrane materials is often a key to develop high performance membranes. For example, membranes made from inorganic porous materials with uniform pore size, such as zeolites, have demonstrated excellent separation performances over conventional polymeric membranes. However, inorganic porous materials are often suffered from their limited topological framework structures and chemical flexibility. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs), as a new class of ordered porous materials with an inorganic-organic hybrid structure, are able to achieve rational designs in both structure and functionalities, and have showed high thermal stability. Hence, it is a very promising type of membrane materials. In this talk we will discuss the synthesis methods for preparation of high quality MOF membranes, and their prospective applications in separation of hydrocarbon mixtures, such as C2/C3, and olefin/paraffin, and isomer mixtures.

Time:
15:25-15:50

Title: Modelling of carbon dioxide solubility in different blends of ionic liquids with amines and diluents using five different statistical correlations and neural networks

Sweta Balchandani
Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University, India

Biography

Ms. Balchandani Sweta Chetananand, is currently working as Faculty in Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Technology at Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University (PDPU) Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India. She has around 05 years of teaching experience. Her research interest are in Modeling and simulation, Process control & Optimization & their applications in Environmental engineering and CO2 Capture using ionic liquids.

Abstract

The present work proposes five statistical correlations to predict CO2 solubility in 19 systems of ionic liquid blends with amines (primary, secondary, tertiary, etc), with other ionic liquids, with diluents such as water, ethanol, etc. over a wide temperature range of 298-353.15 K, pressure range of 49.8 to 6200 kPa and solubility of 0-0.487 mole fraction. The work is also extended by using 36 different combinations of training and learning algorithms using neural networks and the best possible combinations. The work for neural network is done for 22 systems of ionic liquid blends with amines presented. The main rewards of the models studied in the present work are simplicity and least input data, specifically temperature and pressure. The model fitting performance was analyzed calculating percentage absolute average relative deviation (%AARD) and correlation coefficient (R).

Time:
16:05-16:30

Title: Useful applications of byproducts of petroleum industry: Polyurea as a protective coating

Damith Mohotti
University of Sydney, Australia

Biography

Dr Mohotti has developed expertise in many interrelated areas in structural and materials engineering including extreme loadings on structures (blast and impact), wind loadings on buildings and development of smart materials. He is considered as an expert in advanced numerical simulations with his immense contribution to the development of this sector. In addition to his expertise as a researcher he has gained worthy of experience working as a structural engineer and a consultant. Dr. Damith is currently working as a lecturer in the School of Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Engineering and IT at University of Sydney. He currently works as a member of the industrial engagement committee of the school and hold the responsibility of delivering three key units of studies on design of concrete and pre-stressed concrete structures.

Abstract

Polyurea uses by products of petroleum industry and has been identified as a good candidate material to use as a protective coating or an energy absorber. Over the last few decades, many researchers have investigated the use of polyurea as a protective coating material due to its abilityto absorb a considerably high amount of energy compared tomost other similar coating materials. In recent years, researchershave drawn their attention towards the application of polyuria to enhance the resistance of structures and systems against extremeimpulsive loadings. With adequate surface preparation, polyurea bonds well with most structural materials (such as concrete, steel and aluminium), thereby forming composite behavior. It can be used either as the outer face of a structure, or as an inter layer material, by utilizing its compressive or tensile propertiesdepending upon the nature of the load transmitted.Due to the complex nature of its microstructure, polyuria shows a high level of stress–strain non-linearity, rate sensitivity, and a high degree of pressure dependency compared to otherelastomeric materials. In addition, polyurea has a higher energydensity than most other elastomeric materials. In recent years, aspray-in-place methodology has been introduced for polyuria coating, which has increased its usage in many industrial applicationssuch as tank liners, manhole and tunnel coatings, and secondarycoatings on bridges, roofs and parking decks. Recent studies show that it also possessesthe desired characteristics for effective protective coating applicationagainst blast and ballistic loadings in both vehicles and groundstructures.

Time:
16:30-16:55

Title: Pollution of sediments by heavy metals in Lagos Harbour ‐ sources, pathways and management

Awwal Bamanga
University of Portsmouth, UK

Biography

Currently, Awwal Bamanga is in advanced stage of completing my PhD Degree Programme in Environmental Sciences at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (SEES) University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom. He has been researching since the last four years, based on specialty in the field of Marine Sediment Biogeochemistry and Environmental Analysis and Ecosystem in the area of Marine Pollution of the harbour system as a result of shipping, industrial and natural activities. Acquired over twelve years working experience in monitoring and evaluation of pollution control and management in coastal marine and ecosystem within the maritime industry. He possess a range of skills in monitoring marine pollution through identification and detection of Chemical, Biological and Physical pollutants. Analysing and assessing the concentrations of these contaminants using modern advanced environmental equipment, and relate its findings to various sources including quantifications and fluxes from local environment, shipping and industrial activities. The skills also include assessing and evaluating the likely effects of these contaminants on marine environment, marine biota and human health effects in line with global environmental best practices.

Abstract

The coastal zone is influenced by human activities such as fishing, industries and shipping and can become vulnerable due to these persistence anthropogenic actions. Often enclosed and semi-enclosed marine areas such as harbours can become polluted, and this is detrimental to sediment quality. The basin of Lagos Harbour, Nigeria, is an area with restricted water circulation and typifies this situation. This study aimed to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in sediments within the Lagos Harbour and Lagoon system. A total of twenty-six sampling stations were established, with more pristine Apese Lagoon serving as the control area. The different stations were selected according to their related anthropogenic activities and hence likely to have varying contaminant sources and types. Surface (1-5 cm) sediment samples were collected using a Van Veen grab on two occasions; during the wet (September 2013) and dry (February 2014) seasons. The sediment underwent two acid digestion (1M HCl or aqua regia) procedures according to the Canadian National Water Research Institute guidelines and the United States Environment Protection Agency (Method 3050B).The digests were analysed for the heavy metals: arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, lead and zinc. Some of these were selected due to their persistence, toxicity and potential to bio accumulate in organisms. The resultant digests were analysed using both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and optical emission spectro photometry to give the bio available and extractable metal fractions. Total metal concentrations were measured using X-ray fluorescence. The concentration of metals was shown to be higher using the aqua regia method in the dry season compared with the wet season in all the locations including the control area. High concentrations for three metals (As=23, Cr=38, Zn= 144 mg/kg) were found. The concentrations were higher in the Lagos Harbour and urbanised part Lagos Lagoon, where there is an high intensity of anthropogenic activities compared with the control zone. These data are useful for the policy makers to use as part of the baseline data for further investigation and in the development of guidelines for the protection of the marine environment in Nigeria.

Time:
16:55-17:20

Title: Mixed‐layer minerals Niksergievite

Medeo Timur
Satbayev Kazakh National Technical University, Kazakhstan

Biography

Mr. Medeo Timur is from Almaty, Kazakhstan. Medeo Timur graduated from Physics and Mathematics Lyceum № 24 two and a half years ago. Now Medeo Timur is a student of geological faculty of Kazakh national research technical university named after K.I.Satpaev. Medeo Timur chose Geology specifically, because he always interested in the structure of our planet and asked questions like: “What is under my feet?”, ”What is in the depths of the Earth?” and something like that. Last summer he took part in a geological expedition during the summer university practice in the mountains of Karatau in the south of Kazakhstan. That was amazing, he had a good experience. In my spare time from studies, besides the hobbies, which are basketball and football, he usually visit lectures by highly qualified professors of geologists outside the university. This helps me to be versatile in the study of geology and to have an idea of all its branches. It also helps to develop my thinking and imagination.

Abstract

Spouses G. Donney and J. Donney in the 1950s in the study of rare earth fluorine carbonates (parisite, bastnaesite, synchysite) revealed that the crystal lattices of these minerals consist of differently alternating two identical blocks. They called this phenomenon a syntaxy. Later, it was called polysomatism or fragmentarity. Examples of such structures: sulphate-carbonates, sulphate- phosphates, carbonate-borates, borate-silicates, silicate-carbonates (etc.) and also complex structures: uranium-phosphates with sulfate anions, carbonate-boron-silicates and others. We examined in more detail a group of silicate carbonates, namely, layered silicate carbonates. Previously, phyllosilicates were known among mineralogists for clay minerals under the term mixed-layer minerals. Examples of them: corrensite, rectorite, tosudite, etc. But we are interested in layered silicate-carbonates with different mineral layers. Among them: surite (alternation of carbonate - cerussite with silicate - smectite), ferrisurite, niksergievite (2002 - barium-calcium-aluminum carbonate and mica sheets). Mineral niksergievite, found for the first time in Kazakhstan, was studied in detail by our mineralogists and approved by the Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names (CNMMN) at the International Mineralogical Association (IMA). Niksergievite was discovered in one of the mines of the lead-zinc deposit Tekeli (Dzungarian Alatau) at a depth of 500 m. In appearance, it practically does not differ from talc. The color of the mineral is light green. Lustre matte with a pearly gleam. System – monoclinic. Hardness - 1-1,5. Density - 3.21 g / cm3. Very fragile. Crystallo chemical formula: (Ва, Са)2 Аl3(Sі,Аl)4О10(СО3)(ОН)6 * nН2O (n<1). The formula is calculated from the chemical analysis of the mineral performed on the electron probe microanalyzer JCXA 733 and refined in accordance with the data of thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. The mineral forms splices - "rosettes" with a diameter of up to 5 mm of lamellar excretions 1-2 mm thick. The size of clusters reaches 5 cm. The shape of the grains is curved lamellar. Cleavage along the (001) plane is eminent. Associates with kleofan, galena, pyrite, barite, dolomite, celsian in quartz-calcite veins crosscutting a highly metamorphosed limestone. The study by electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed an unusual structure of silicate. Microdiffraction patterns from lamellar crystals formed by a hexagonal grid of point-like reflexes, and annular electron diffraction patterns from polycrystalline preparations confirm the belonging of niksergievite to phyllosilicates. The structural information transmitted by diffraction characteristics on the electronogramm from oblique texture of niksergievite, allowed to identify the syngony, the space group, the unit cell parameters of the mineral and draw conclusions about its structural model. The structural model proposed by S. Britvin, an employee of the St. Petersburg University, was used as a basis for the crystalline structure of mineral: Niksergievite belongs to phyllosilicates with mixed-layer structure with the participation of barium- and aluminium-carbonate and mica sheets. The mineral is named in honor of Corresponding Member of the Academy of Sciences of the Kazakh SSR, Honored Worker of Science and Technology of the Kazakh SSR, Professor Nikolai Grigoryevich Sergiev (1901-1960) - geologist of the Leningrad school, who made a great contribution to the study of geology and mineralogy in Kazakhstan and raised a generation of Kazakhstan geologists.

Sessions:
Petroleum Exploration and Fossil Fuels, Public and Environmental Health & Petroleum Economy, Oilfield Chemicals & Oil and Gas Drilling & Oil Refining

Time:
09:30-09:55

Title: Bio-ethanol; A renewable energy source from waste of beer industry

Mazhar Ul Islam
Dhofar University, Oman

Biography

Dr. Mazhar has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from Kyungpook National University reamined as Post Doctoral Fellow and contract professor in same institute for two years, respectively. He is the chairperson of Chemical Engineering department, Dhofar University, Salalah, Oman. He has published more than 40 Journal papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed Journals.

Abstract

The currect depleting fossil fuel reservoirs are creating alarming situation for future Energy requirements. Renewable energy resources are considered one of the important alternative to the future energy crices. Biofuels are among those alternative resources that are considered vital to replace the fossil fuels. Biofuels, including bioethanol has been produced from plants and other food crops. The application of primary feedstocks for producing biofuels has been limited by three major factors: high cost of feedstock, processing cost of such materials, and food deficiency problems. Therefore, there is a big need to explore alternative, cheap and raw resources for production of biofuels. In the current study, we have explored the potential of waste of beer fermentation broth (WBFB) for production of bio-ethanol through yeast fermentation. The system effectively produced bio-ethanol in appreciable quantities that was determined through ethanol assay kit using UV-spectrophotometer. Furthermore, we focused on using a cell free enzyme system to increase the bioethanol yield. The system was impressive and provided good signs for future enhancement. With further developments and operational designing, this system can be effectively employed for industrial-scale bio-ethanol production.

Time:
09:55-10:20

Title: Energy recovery from wastewater streams utilizing Pressure Retarded Osmosis in the State of Kuwait

Bader S Al‐Anzi
Kuwait University, Kuwait

Biography

Dr. Bader Al-Anzi is the chairman of Environmental Technology & Management Department at Kuwait University and research affiliate in mechanical engineering department at MIT, Boston, USA. He joined MIT nuclear & engineering department as a full time visiting scientist in 2013 until 2014. He pursued his graduate studies in chemical engineering from various reputed universities majoring in water & wastewater treatment utilizing unconventional processes. His research experience includes wastewater treatment, desalination, two phase flow/aeration, corrosion, bioengineering and air pollution control. He has also worked in several governmental organizations that focus on water desalination and wastewater treatment. He has completed several projects in the area of water treatment, and currentlyhe is the Principal Investigator of a prestigious project worth 5.5 million dollars. He supervises PhD& MSc students in chemical engineering exploring unconventional wastewater treatment processes. His desire to explore innovative processes and creativity led him to obtain more than 14 US and 2 European patents that resulted in manufacturing and certifying one of his inventions by American Aerators Company in USA to be used globally to treat contaminated seawater. He has received many outstanding awards both internationally and locally. He has several papers published in peer reviewed journals in various environmental areas.

Abstract

The discharge from desalination plants in the State of Kuwait returns brine of high salinity to the Gulf that containscontaminantscausing harmful impact to the environment of the coastal region. However,the wastewater discharge to the Gulf is of low salinity andmay driveeutrophication of coastal waters. The present study investigates the application of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) technology, as a promising source of green energy and an emerging membrane-based technology for recovering energy from concentration differences between water streams. The proposed work examines the feasibility of using PRO to generate energy from wastewater and desalination plants in Kuwait by calculating the power density using a PRO zero and one dimensional models. The zero model accounts for the effects of concentration polarization (CP) and salt leakage (B') to produce realistic results. Case studies on the potential re-use of treated wastewater effluent (TWE) and brine reject streams from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Kuwait were studied to determine the power generated from each of the WWTPs. The PRO power density (W) was studied as a function of hydraulic pressure (ΔP) at different feed and draw solution concentrations. The results showed that the power densities were higher at higher concentration. This increase in power density values was attributed to the higher driving forces acting on the system. Concentration polarization (CP) and salt leakage (B') reduce the driving forces across the membrane. The effects of CP and (B') vary depending on the concentration difference of the draw and feed solutions across the membrane. Also, the present work includes the study of PRO one dimensional model equations to predictthe membrane area required to achieve high permeation using actual operational data of Kuwait.

Time:
10:20-10:45

Title: Synthesis and characterization of novel amine‐based deep eutectic solvents for CO2 capturing

Al Nashef
Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, UAE

Biography

Dr. Al Nashef joined King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, after obtaining his Ph. D. from the University of South Carolina in 2004. In 2011, Al Nashef was promoted to associate professor. Al Nashef was very active in research related to green engineering and sustainability. In 2014, Dr. Al Nashef joined Masdar Institute of Science and Technology at Abu Dhabi. Al Nashef co-authored more than 80 peer-reviewed journal publications. In addition, he received 7 patents from US and EU Patent Offices. He is also a recipient of several prestigious awards including King Abdullah Award for best invention in 2013.

Abstract

In this study, we report new experimental measurements of the density, viscosity, conductivity, pH, surface tension and thermal stability of three different deep eutectic solvents (DES), (Choline chloride + Monoethanolamine, ChCl-MEA), (Choline chloride + Diethanolamine, ChCl-DEA) and (Choline chloride + Methyldiethanolamine, ChCl-MDEA), representing the primary, secondary and tertiary amines, respectively. The experimental data was obtained at temperature from 293.15-353.15 K and for three different choline chloride: amine molar ratios of 1:6, 1:8 and 1:10. Results revealed that amine-based DESs are more thermally stable as compared to stand-alone amine solvents. The density and viscosity showed a negative relationship with temperature in the linear regression model based on the least square approach. On the other hand, the conductivity increased linearly with increasing the temperature. The density, viscosity, stability and conductivity increased with decreasing molar ratio of the amine in the DESs. However, there was no clear trend in the pH with molar ratio. The prepared DESs showed very promising results in CO2 capturing.

Time:
10:45-11:10

Title: Analysis of exhaust Emissions from engines fueled with Gasoline and their blends with biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil

Cynthia Nkolika
University of Nigeria, Nigeria

Biography

Dr Cynthia Nkolika Ibeto was born on the 10th of August 1982. She graduated with a B Sc. degree (Industrial Chemistry) from University of Ibadan in 2004. In 2007 and 2010 she obtained her M Sc. and PhD (both in Analytical Chemistry) from University of Nigeria Nsukka (UNN). She was an Academic Research Fellow of the National Centre for Energy Research and Development, UNN (September, 2008 to April, 2016) and is currently a Senior lecturer of the Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, UNN. Her research area is in the field of Environmental/Analytical Chemistry. She has received a number of Scholarships/awards/travel grants notably Analytical Chemistry Trust Fund, Developing World Scholarship, 2014 and Schlumberger Faculty for the Future Fellowship award, 2015. She is a member of some Professional bodies: Royal Society of Chemistry, Chemical Society of Nigeria, Institute of Chartered Chemists of Nigeria and Organization of Women in Science for developing world.

Abstract

Analysis of exhaust emissions from engines fueled with gasoline and their blends with biodiesel was carried out. The biodiesel was produced from waste cooking oil via transesterification. Physicochemical analysis of the waste cooking oil and biodiesel were carried out using ASTM methods. The results of the analysis for biodiesel are as follows: moisture content (0.05 %), specific gravity (0.90), acid value (0.22 mg KOH/g), sulphur content (0.01 %), flash point (155oC), kinematic viscosity (1.90 m2/s), pour point (-3.00oC), ash content (0.09 %), iodine number (13.45 gI2/100g) and calorific value (34,400 KJ/Kg). Analysis of exhaust emissions (CO, CO2, O2 and NOx) from gasoline vehicles as well as big and small generators were carried out using a Bacharach Portable Combustion Analyzer 2. Ten of each of the gasoline vehicles (motorcycles, tricycles, mini-buses and small cars) were analyzed and their average CO, CO2 and NOx emissions were calculated. Mini-buses emitted the highest concentration of CO (3511.7 ppm) and CO2 (6.0%) while small cars emitted the highest concentration of NOx (27.1 ppm) and the lowest concentration of CO (2131.9 ppm) and CO2 (3.5%). However, tricycles emitted the lowest concentration of NOx (3.5ppm). The concentrations of CO from all the petrol vehicles exceeded the 2nd European emission standard (1996) adopted by Nigeria. Ten small and ten large capacity generators were also analysed. Small generators emitted more CO (2876.8 ppm) while the large generators emitted more NOx (30.6 ppm) and CO2 (6.58%). However, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between the emissions from large and small capacity generators. Gasoline were blended with biodiesel and used to fuel two generators and one motorcycle at different blend ratios ranging from B5 to B40. At every blend ratio, there was a significant percentage reduction in CO, CO2 and NOx emitted in the small and large gasoline-biodiesel generators but an increase in NOx in motorcycle with every increase in blend ratio. With the inadherence of the vehicular emissions to an already obsolete adopted Nigerian emission standard, it is expected that the Nigerian environment with about 10 million vehicles and numerous generators will not meet the WHO air quality standard of 9 ppm (CO) and 0.0128ppm (NOx), and therefore would enhance health and environmental hazards associated with exposures to these pollutants.

Time:
11:25-11:50

Title: Steam‐cracking of Algerian Gas condensate compounded with Ethane

Fahima Bouarar
Boumerdes University, Algeria

Biography

Ms Fahima BOUARAR is a Chair Professor at the Department of Processes Engineering, Laghouat University (Algeria). She obtained his Baccalaureat in Science of life and Nature from Polytechnic High School (Bouira, Algeria) in 2000, Studied Petrochemistry in Boumerdes University, and obtained his Engineer in 2006. She followed these studies at University of Hydrocarbons and Chimestry. She got her Magister in 2011. Currently she is preparing her Ph.D. Her research focuses on the potential of using Algerian gas condensates and the effect of changes in Operating Conditions on the Pyrolysis products. She is Petrochemistry Unit Chief at Laghouat University since 2014.

Abstract

The Algerian gas condensate may be valuated as a raw matter to obtain maximum ethylene and propylene yields, the later are used as first materials to produce polyethylene and polypropylene. It is judged utile to substitute ethane as pyrolysis feedstock by the Algerian condensate compounded with ethane. Several dilutions (5%, 10% and 20%) of the gas condensate and its fractions with ethane have been prepared to be used as pyrolysis feed stocks. The effect of temperature and residence-time on the yield of pyrolysis products have been studied well as their influence on the composition of gas and liquid pyrolyses. Taking into account all the raw materials compounded with different dosages (5, 10, 20%) and the variation of these parameters, the experimental results obtained are: • A maximum yield of ethylene for a dosage of 10 % of the condensate’s light fraction. The process temperature is 820°C. • A maximum yield of propylene using the average fraction with a dosage of 10%. The temperature is 720°C. • Maximum yield of liquid pyrolysis using the average fraction with a dosage of 20 %. The temperature is 720°C.

Time:
11:50-12:15

Title: Investigation on indigenous weighting materials as substitute to barite in oil field drilling mud formulation in Nigeria

Falode Olugbenga
University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Biography

Dr. Falode, Olugbenga Adebanjo holds PhD Degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the same Department. He is also a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at the Centre for Petroleum, Energy Economics and Law (CPEEL), University of Ibadan, Nigeria. A common thread running through Dr. Falode’s research interests focus on flow assurance and using material engineering in developing inexpensive green materials for flow assurance and hydrocarbon recovery, and he has published widely in reputable journals. Dr. Falode, a MacArthur Research Grant and Petroleum Technology Development Fund (PTDF) recipient is a Member of the Nigerian Society of Engineers (NSE), Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), and is a registered engineer with the Council for the Regulation of Engineering in Nigeria. He is an Oil and Gas Consultant to several companies.

Abstract

Weighting materials are important components needed to increase the density of drilling mud in order to provide enough hydrostatic pressure to balance abnormal pore pressures. In Nigeria, millions of dollars are spent annually on importing barite to serve this purpose. However, there exist large reserves of weighting materials such as barite, hematite, dolomite, calcite, ilmenite in Nigeria; hence, the need to investigate the suitability of these materials as substitute for imported barite in oil field drilling mud formulations. Samples of barite, haematite, dolomite and calcite were obtained from three geographical locations in Nigeria and pulverised to 3.9µm using the 4-R Pendulum pulveriser, while physicochemical properties of the samples such as specific gravity and percentage purity were determined. Rheological and filtration properties of mud samples of 10-20ppg formulated with the local weighting agents were determined using API rheometer and filter press respectively. A 23 factorial design model was used to obtain optimum combination of additives for the drilling mud slurry. Specific gravity and percentage purity of the local weighting materials ranged from 2.9-5.1 and 71-96% respectively. The plastic viscosity, apparent viscosity, yield point, fluid loss and filter cake thickness of the samples varied from 9.5-14cp, 22-25cp, 18-27Ib/100ft2, 9-13ml and o.16-0.27in respectively. The rheological properties and the filter cake thickness increased with mud weight while the filter loss decreased with mud weight. The performance of local weighting materials were compared to imported barite and the results showed that for a given mud density, Azara barite had the lowest plastic viscosity, while Ikpeshi calcite had the same yield point as the imported barite. However, Itakpe haematite produced the thinnest mud cake, while at lower mud density; Azara barite produced same mud cake thickness as the imported barite. The local materials utilised in this study can be used as weighting materials with appropriate beneficiation, although, with tremendous physiological effects on consortium of resident microbial flora.

Time:
12:15-12:40

Title: Equilibrium studies for the removal of Fe2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ in wastewater on formaldehyde polymerized peanut testa (arachis hypogaea l) extract

Theresa Uchechukwu
University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Biography

Theresa Uchechukwu is currently a World Bank research fellow at the African Centre of Excellence in Oilfield Chemicals Research, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. She has more than 20years work experience in industry laboratories especially in areas of production chemistry, laboratory operations and administration from the Aluminium Smelter Company, Ikot Abasi, Maylux Industries Nigeria Limited, Nigerian Gas Company (NGC) and West African Glass Industry. Her area of interest is in the development of Ion Exchange Resins from Agricultural wastes for the purification of wastewater. Theresa is a highly focused and diligent person, a great listener with excellent organizational skills.

Abstract

Formaldehyde crosslinked peanut testa extract was used as an adsorbent to remove Fe2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ in wastewater by batch experiments at varying parameter conditions. The efficiencies of the removal processes were found to depend significantly on the pH and temperature of wastewater; initial adsorbate concentration and contact time, less significantly on the amount of adsorbent used but were independent of the stirring speed of the suspension. The removal efficiency of Zn2+ increased from 61.2 to 72.1 and to 80.3% at RT, 50 and 60oC respectively. The percentages of Ni2+ removed at pH 2, 6 and 8 were: 18.7; 62.7 and 61.9 respectively. The amount of Fe2+ removed improved from 21.7 to 78.6 and dropped to 74.2% between the 30th, 120th and 150th minute while 57.4; 46.8 and 33.1 and 57.7; 48.4 and 37.2% of Pb2+ were removed at initial concentrations of 10; 20 and 30mg/L respectively. The percentage removal of Fe2+ which rose from 65.3 to 71.4 when the adsorbent dose was increased from 2.0 to 4.0g only improved from78.6 to 78.8 when the amount was raised from 8.0 to 10.0g. When the solutions were stirred at 90; 180 and 210 rpm, 56.6; 57.1 and 57.3% of Pb2+ were removed. The equilibrium adsorption data agreed with Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-firstorder kinetic models. The study shows that formaldehyde crosslinked peanut testa extract is good for removing Fe2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ in wastewater and supports the application of this technique in mitigating the burden of waste disposal. Keyword: Peanut testa extract, heavy metal ions, adsorption, Langmuir isotherm, pseudo-first-order.

Sessions:
Energy Conversion and Storage, Fuel Cell and Natural Gas & Exploration and Fossil Fuels, Chemical Applications in Producing Oil and Gas

Time:
10:00-10:25

Title: Contemporary economic processes in Russian Oil industry

Liudmila Berezhnaia
Gubkin Russian State Oil and Gas University, Russia

Biography

Lyudmila Berezhnaya proved her thesis and received her doctorate in 1998 on the basis of previously completed work. She is a highly qualified specialist in the field of economics, organization and management of the oil and gas industry. For a long time, she worked in the research institutes of the industry. Under her guidance and direct participation such large-scale work as a strategy for development of oil and gas regions was carried out; the improving measures for the efficiency of public fund management of mineral resources were developed; the evaluation of promising areas of mineral resources and territories in the face of limited information was undertaken, an economic assessment of oil and gas assets in the international classification of reserves was carried out and so on. Now Associate Professor of Financial Management in Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas. She has more than 60 scientific published works.

Abstract

The objective of this study show the current state of the oil sector in Russia and the main measures aimed at the resistance of low oil prices in unfavorable geopolitical conditions. Briefly discussed principles of the tax system, and evaluated the effectiveness of the implementation of tax maneuver for the state and subsoil users. The tax system takes into account the fluctuations in oil prices, allowing you to establish mutually beneficial relationships between the main actors in the oil business: Host Government and subsoil users. The implementation of a rational tax policy has allowed softening the damage caused by the fall in world market prices of oil and international sanctions. As a result, in a crisis, oil companies continue to operate successfully and even increase profits. The improved tax policy easies the burden of the exploration of small and medium recourses including those characterizes by the difficultly-extracted reserves and new fields in the east of the country. The volume of oil provided on these beneficial conditions e in 2015 exceeded 160 million tons, which amounts accounting to 30% of total Russian oil production. The limited investment borrowing led to widespread decline in exploration re industry, suspense the implementation of large projects. In the context of the changed geopolitical environment, companies are forced to pay attention to increase its internal efficiency. Oil companies are diversifying investments and sales markets. The emphasis is made not on crude oil extraction but on its processing and obtaining the final product. The international division of labor led to the fact that Russia possesses enough oil and no equipment even though it used to have all necessary technologies and techniques including the one for directional and horizontal drilling on land and sea. The imposition of sanctions has given impetus to the recovery of the Russian industry.

Time:
10:25-10:50

Title: Potential of Ethylene Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass via Ethanol Conversion

Manyangadze Milton
Harare Institute of Technology, Zimbabwe

Biography

Manyangadze Milton, is the current Head of the Chemical and Process Systems Engineering Department at Harare Institute of technology, Harare, Zimbabwe. He holds a Master of Technology Degree in Chemical Technology from Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad, Telangana, India and a B.Eng. (Hons.) Chemical Engineering, NUST, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. The Author has two publications and one Book Chapter in waste water treatment using nanoadsorbents. He has presented his work in 4 local and international Conferences, one of which he was a guest speakers. Apart from current trends in waste water treatment, the author has also research interests in current trends in sustainable renewable energy technologies, including production of petrochemicals from renewable sources.

Abstract

Ethylene is one of the high composition chemicals derived from fossil fuels, mainly by steam cracking of naphtha and shorter hydrocarbons.The chemical has a diverse range of end-uses, especially in plastic manufacture. Basically, the chemical is a building block of a diverse range of petrochemicals. Continuous and excessive use of fossil fuels as the predominant feedstock has resulted in detrimental effects to the environment and also future energy security concerns as depletion of the natural resource is inevitable. The search for alternative, sustainable and renewable sources for the production of ethylene has led to the current suggested options for using renewable bio-ethanol from second generation feedstocks as a suitable precursor for eco-friendly ethylene. For the purpose of presenting a sustainable and efficient process for the production of ethylene, this study explores the potential of using lignocellulosic biomass feedstock of common reeds to produce ‘green’ ethylene via cellulosic ethanol. The paper focuses on the production of 1000 litres per day of ethylene with global financial benefits through reduction of raw material costs for plastic manufacture as well as improving the performance of the chemical industry. Experiments were performed using common reeds. They were initially milled and alkaline pretreated. This was followed by dilute acid hydrolysis, neutralization and co-fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used for the co-fermentation process. From experiments, it was observed that pretreatment at higher alkali concentrations gave higher sugar yields. At 4% alkali concentrations, a Brix of 10% was obtained. Using an acid hydrolysis, a Brix of 13.5% was obtained at 10% acid concentration. Results also show that the sugar yield was dependent on temperature. Hydrolysis at 100oC gave the highest sugar yield of 20.5% Brix. Conversion to ethanol via fermentation was found to be 49.58%. Ethanol to Ethylene conversion was done over aluminum oxide catalyst. From experiments, 25ml of ethanol gave 200ml of the gaseous product at 400oC.

Time:
10:50-11:15

Title: High Pressure Thermophysical Properties of Complex Mixtures Relevant to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Processing

Saif Al Ghafri
University of Western Australia, Australia

Biography

Dr Saif Al Ghafri is a postdoctoral research fellow at UWA working in the Thermophysical properties measurements. He obtained his PhD in 2013 on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) from Imperial College London, focusing on measurements of the Thermophysical properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with reservoir fluids. Dr Al Ghafri worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Imperial College for two years before joining UWA. He is currently involved in different LNG projects within the Fluid Science and Resources (FSR) group including vapor-liquid equilibrium, viscosity, solid-liquid equilibrium, density, bubble points and boil-off gas measurements.

Abstract

Knowledge of the thermophysical properties of complex mixtures at extreme conditions have always been essential to the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) industry’s evolution because of the tremendous technical challenges present at all stages in the supply chain from production to liquefaction to transport. In this work, we present a wide range of experimental measurements made for different binary and ternary mixtures relevant to LNG processing. For this purpose, customized and specialized apparatus were designed and validated over the temperature range (200 to 423) K at pressures to 35 MPa. The mixtures studied were (CH4 + C3H8), (CH4 + C3H8 + CO2) and (CH4 + C3H8 + C7H16); in the last of these the heptane contents was up to 10 mol %. Viscosity was measured using a vibrating wire apparatus, while mixture densities were obtained by means of a high-pressure magnetic-suspension densimeter and an isochoric cell apparatus. Surface tensions was measured using the capillary rise method in a visual cell, which also enabled the location of the mixture critical point to be determined from observations of critical opalescence. Mixture heat capacities were measured using a customised high-pressure differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The extensive experimental data gathered in this work were compared with a variety of different advanced engineering models frequently used for predicting thermophysical properties of mixtures relevant to LNG processing. In many cases the discrepancies between the predictions of different engineering models for these mixtures was large, and the high quality data allowed erroneous but often widely-used models to be identified. The data enable the development of new or improved models, to be implemented in process simulation software, so that the fluid properties needed for equipment and process design can be predicted reliably which is essential for oil and gas industry. This in turn will enable reduced capital and operational expenditure by the LNG industry.

Time:
11:30-11:55

Title: Shale Gas: How it can be targeted?

Abdelaziz L. Khlaifat
Abu Dhabi Polytechnic, UAE

Biography

Abdelaziz Khlaifat is the Head of Petroleum Engineering Department at Abu Dhabi Polytechnic and AD Poly SPE Students Chapter Advisor. Prior to joining AD Poly, Abdelaziz worked as a Research and Development Manager of Dhahran Research Center at Weatherford International (Geo-science Development). Earlier, he worked as a Senior Reservoir Engineer, specialized in an unconventional resources (tight and shale gas) at Weatherford Saudi Arabia. Before joining Saudi Arabia office, he worked as a senior reservoir engineer (modeling and simulation) in the reservoir engineering group of the Weatherford Well Engineering Center of Excellence in Dubai. He obtained his BSc degree in Petroleum Engineering (1990) from Moscow Institute of Oil and Gas, Moscow-Russia, Master of Chemical Engineering and PhD in Chemical/Reservoir Engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago-USA in 1994 and 1998, respectively. Before joining Weatherford, he had held different positions in the academia. In 2009 he was promoted to a full professor of chemical engineering at Mutah University, Jordan. Abdelaziz is actively involved in scientific research and development of novel methodologies and techniques in tight and shale gas reservoirs, shale gas resource development workflow and tight gas staged field experiments. He has authored/coauthored over 80 publications, including journal articles, book chapters and specialized conference proceedings in the areas of flow through porous media, hydrocarbon reservoir engineering, unconventional tight and shale gas, managed pressure drilling, non-aqueous phase Liquid transport, photocatalysis, two phase flow modeling and simulation, and Dead Sea related-research. He is an active member of the SPE, AIChE, GA, JES, JEA, AHWA and SFERA.

Abstract

In the past, the oil and gas industry considered gas locked in tight, impermeable shale uneconomical to produce. However, advances in directional well drilling and reservoir stimulation have dramatically increased gas production from unconventional shale. Over the past decades extensive natural gas development has taken place in “Shale” formations in North America. Although North America is producing shale gas at an economic level, producers are so eager to increase shale gas recovery. The decline in conventional resources and the demands for natural gas encouraged different countries throughout the world (e.g. Germany, Poland, Romania, Algeria, Saudi Arabia, China and others) to follow North American experience and produce the gas from shale. Unconventional gas shales are fine grained, organic rich, sedimentary rocks. The shales are both the source of and the reservoir for natural gas, unlike conventional petroleum reservoirs. In the shales, gas occupies pore spaces, and organic matter adsorbs gas on its surface. The Society of Petroleum Engineers describes “unconventional resources” as petroleum accumulations that are pervasive throughout a large area and that are not significantly affected by hydrodynamic influences (they are also called “continuous-type deposits”). The reservoir systems have a gas-bearing strata that are not densely stratified, do not have a gas/water contact, and persist over a very large geographic area. The term “shale” has been used to describe these formations due to the high argillaceous content in the rocks, as well as the relatively high gamma ray response compared to traditional conventional reservoirs. These formations, while appearing very argillaceous, also commonly contain high volumes of silt and other non-clay material such as quartz, calcite and kerogen. These lithologic variations make understanding of these highly complex reservoir rocks challenging, but essential, to achieving successful results in shale gas development. Though the shales may be as porous as other sedimentary reservoir rocks, their extremely small pore sizes make them relatively impermeable to gas flow, unless natural or artificial fractures occur. Directional drilling and “hydraulic fracturing” are instrumental in exploiting this resource; their application has opened up significant new resources in these rocks and added significant volumes to the natural gas supply in North America. It is very important for gas producers to follow a well-defined screening procedure that helps them to decide whether to go after shale gas reservoirs exploitation. Shale gas development history, reserves, similarities and differences, economics, regional prospective, screening, shale core analysis and shale gas in place estimates will be presented. The presented screening plan is essential and of great help to oil and gas operators to make a go/no-go decision on shale gas projects.

Time:
11:55-12:20

Title: Key Points of API 581 Risk Based Inspection Methodology

Huseyin Baran Akinbingol
Ministry of Labour and Social Security, Turkey

Biography

Huseyin Baran Akinbingol is presently working at Board of Labour Inspection at Ministry of Labour and Social Security (TURKEY) from the year 2010, as a senior labour inspector especially in the fields of inspection of chemical industries and safety reports, according to process safety, control of major accidents (COMAH/Seveso) directive, and other legislations. He graduates from Gazi University, with bachelor degrees chemical engineering (2004) and business administration (2013). Worked before at Crude Oil Pipeline Construction project (2004), Plant Construction (2006-2008) and Bureau VERITAS (2008-2010) as an industrial inspector with the capabilities of safety (Occupational Safety Expert), welding engineering (International Institute of Welding) and painting (Training within Industry & British Gas), non destructive inspection (Middle East Technical University).

Abstract

Since the year 2000, risk based inspection methodology have been developed by American Petroleum Institute (API) for refining, petrochemical, chemical process plants and oil and gas production facilities. The third edition of the recommended practice for risk based inspection (RBI) methodology API 581 has been released at April 2016. API 581 divided there parts which are the inspection planning (part 1), probability of failure (POF/part 2) and consequence of failure methodology (COF/part 3). Part 1 provides methods used to develop an inspection plan for fixed equipment, including pressure vessels, piping, atmospheric storage tanks (AST), pressure relief devices (PRD) and heat exchanger tube bundles. The methods for calculating the POF for fixed equipment are covered in Parts 1 and 2. The POF is based on the component type and damage mechanisms present based on the process fluid characteristics, design conditions, materials of construction, and the original construction code. Part 3 provides methods for computing the COF in two different levels. Level 1, is based on equations with a finite set of well-known variables generated for common fluids or fluid groups found in refinery and petrochemical processing units while Level 2, is a more rigorous method that can be used for any fluid stream composition. COF results are presented in terms of either area or financial loss. The financial losses include such costs as equipment repair and replacement, environmental cleanup costs but are not limited. Some of those costs calculations need to determine constant values for the unit area which are changing from the country to country and company to company. Also in some calculations such as release rate calculation need constant values which are given in ranges and effects the overall consequences calculations. The selection of inspection effectiveness category is one of the primarily factor effects the value of damage factor and POF analysis finally. In this study, some of those key points are revealed out and discussed to understand the RBI studies better. Consequently, those key points could be used to have an idea of RBI software reliability and development of the RBI procedures and studies of the company.

Time:
12:20-12:45

Title: Forecasting the future natural gas demand trends in Nigeria

Falode Olugbenga
University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Biography

Dr. Falode, Olugbenga Adebanjo holds PhD Degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the same Department. He is also a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at the Centre for Petroleum, Energy Economics and Law (CPEEL), University of Ibadan, Nigeria. A common thread running through Dr. Falode’s research interests focus on flow assurance and using material engineering in developing inexpensive green materials for flow assurance and hydrocarbon recovery, and he has published widely in reputable journals. Dr. Falode, a MacArthur Research Grant and Petroleum Technology Development Fund (PTDF) recipient is a Member of the Nigerian Society of Engineers (NSE), Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), and is a registered engineer with the Council for the Regulation of Engineering in Nigeria. He is an Oil and Gas Consultant to several companies.

Abstract

Nigeria has continually relied on its hydro and thermal stations as the main source of electricity generation, with more emphasis placed on thermal generation plants due to the abundance of gas resources. In spite of the abundance of gas resources, it ranked among the list of countries in the world with less access to energy, with percentage of population having access to electricity put at 48.0%. This study used a hybrid model approach combining PEST and ERASME models to analyse the current trend of natural gas consumption and future demand outlook for Nigeria over a-ten year medium term. From PEST Model, five (Technical, Commercial, Corporate, Political and Economic) perspectives and four possible straight forward scenarios (Growth, Stability, Emerging and Decline) were also analysed. The ERASME model provided an econometric approach using an Ordinary Least Square Regression analysis with Natural Gas Consumption, as dependent variable against population, economic activities (RGDP), gas price (Power Sector Price and Commercial sector Price) and prices of alternative fuels (LPFO, AGO, and PMS) as independent variables. Natural gas consumption forecast was made based on relative coefficients of variables; the result collated was subjected to Monte Carlo simulation using @ Risk software. The PEST Model analysis showed that natural gas supply capacity was to increase to 10.0bscfd by 2017, from the current 2.5bscfd, which invariably would stimulate increase in natural gas consumption. The Ordinary Least Square regression result showed that natural gas consumption would be driven by, gas price, economic activities, and population. The result from ERASME Model showed that by 2025, the GDP will be N1667.26Trillion, population at 234.23million, while the overall price of natural gas to power factoring inflation is expected to rise to $8.78Mscf with yearly natural gas consumption increasing to 1204.41bscf respectively. In conclusion, Nigeria gas demand will experience an increasing upward demand trend in natural gas consumption (2015-2025), although certain economic, financial and technology-related factors such as price of natural gas relative to other energy sources, required amount of financial investments in installation of gas power generation plants relative primarily to renewable, nuclear and coal fired plants, transportation costs of natural gas from the extraction facilities relative to other sources of energy, and available gas reserves matter the most in shaping the future gas demand in Nigeria. Keywords: Electricity generation, ERASME model, natural gas demand in Nigeria, renewable energy.

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