Program Schedule

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Keynote Speaker

Time:
09:30 - 10:00

Title: Flo nursing care & patient satisfaction

Aysha Ali Al Mehri
Emirates Nursing Association, UAE

Biography

19 years of professional experience in health care management with various leadership roles in hospital sector and project management. Contributing in part time as an advisory role for strategic planning in health care services. Was honored to be part and team leader of increasing Nursing attraction initiative project at country level ;carried out with successful outcome many of healthcare project at national level. My strengths includes the ability to analyze key issues, innovative approach to create ideas, Effective communicator with strong team-building and ability to handle multi tasks so as to accomplish objectives and meet the expectation , able to work in high-growth, and complex work environment with diverse challenges in any organization

Abstract

Nursing care has a prominent role in patient satisfaction. Using a nursing model to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care helps define and clarify this concept. To evaluate and improve the quality of care provided, it is of vital importance to investigate the quality of care in the context of health care. Patient satisfaction is a significant indicator of the quality of care. Consequently, quality work includes investigations that map out patient satisfaction with nursing care. To improve the quality of nursing care, the nurse needs to know what factors influence patient satisfaction. The aim of this literature study was to describe the influences on patient satisfaction with regard to nursing care in the context of health care. There is variety of instruments for assessing the patients' satisfaction, questionnaires being most widely used methodology in nursing practice. A reliable and valid questionnaire for assessing patients' satisfaction, applied on regular basis in nursing practice, provides data on quality of care provided in the department or institution. Such data are compared and evaluated, providing a base for continuing monitoring and improvement of the quality of care. Patient's satisfaction with the provided nursing care is positive indicator, not only for the patient himself, but also for the nurse and the healthcare institution, because satisfied patients more strictly follow the advice of healthcare practitioners, their hospitalization period is shorter, and thus expenses of the healthcare are lower. Though aware of important role of nurses, the assessment of effects of nursing services to the desired therapy outcome and patients satisfaction with provided healthcare in this region is still deficient. Without such information and knowledge nursing activity can't be properly planned and provided in a best way possible. Moreover, nurses in this region need further research, which will manifest and emphasize their contribution to the final result of the health care and make them more prominent. Though aware of important role of nurses, the assessment of effects of nursing services to the desired therapy outcome and patients satisfaction with provided healthcare in this region is still deficient. Without such information and knowledge nursing activity can't be properly planned and provided in a best way possible. Moreover, nurses in this region need further research, which will manifest and emphasize their contribution to the final result of the health care and make them more prominent.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
10:00 - 10:30

Title: A culturally sensitive recruitment model for arabic nursing

Seamus Cowman
Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, Bahrain

Biography

Prof Seamus Cowman: PhD, MSc, FAAN, FFNMRCSI, PG Cert Ed (Adults), Dip N (London), RNT, RGN, RPN. Seamus Cowman is the first Professor of Nursing at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and is also Head of Department. He is a registered psychiatric and general nurse. Seamus completed his academic studies at University of London, University of Surrey and in completing his PhD at Dublin City University he became the first nurse to obtain a PhD from an Irish University. He is also a Fellow of the Faculty of nursing and Midwifery RCSI, and in Nov 2010 become the first nurse from Ireland to receive a fellowship of the American Academy of Nursing and as a Fellow of the American of Nursing joins a small band of internatinal nurses. Internationally Seamus has established education programmes in Malaysia, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain where he established a School of Nursing & Midwifery at the RCSI University of Bahrain. Prof Cowman’s has over 120 publications and has obtained €3.5 million in research funding. His research work relates to Health Services Research related to Stroke care, Wound care, Day surgery and Mental Health Prof Cowman is an Executive member of the European Violence in Psychiatry Research Group. He has undertaken RCT research work on chronic wounds, prevention of pressure ulcers and violence management and health professions education. He has undertaken sytematic reviews and contributed to the Cochrane collaboration. Has undertaken interdisciplinary research and the most recent work relate HRB funded research on standards for day surgery in Ireland.

Abstract

Background Consistent with Bahrainization, the development and expansion of an indigenous nursing profession through increasing the number of Bahrainis working as nurses must be a health service priority. However, in attracting local candidates to study nursing, the public image of nursing in the Middle East continues to be of concern. At present, in Bahrain there are 4 nurses per 1,000 of the population compared to the OECD average of 8.7. This study aims to identify the factors that influence the High School Students and their parents in Bahrain to choose the nursing as a future career Methods A mixed methods research design was used. The study sample included high school students, students’ parents, career guidance counselors and nursing students. A nursing recruitment intervention was tested and evaluated in a sample of Bahraini schools with High School students. Findings The findings of this study indicate that, although the students expressed positive perceptions about nursing, this was not matched with a desire to become nurses themselves. Career desirability involves more than reinforcing positive perceptions about nursing. The study reported that the public perceptions of Bahraini people about nursing may be grounded in strong cultural influences. As a means of enhancing nursing image and perception, the study proposed a best practice model for nursing recruitment that considers the unique culture and contexts of the Arab countries. The recruitment model Nurse-P.R.A.M is new and is a uniquely Arabic creation, and is focused on recruitment to nursing in the region and in particular Bahrain. The model is built from the unique evidence developed through this study. Conclusion The worldwide shortage of nursing is having an adverse impact on health systems. Western models and approaches to nursing recruitment is not successful in the Middle East. This study is significant as it will place the perceptions and understanding of Bahraini people and culture and the centre of nursing promotion and recruitment. Some of the issues raised in the study are reflective of the core international literature; however there are fundamental issues particular to the Gulf region, which will require attention in a context of an overall nursing recruitment strategy for Arabic nursing.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
10:45 - 11:15

Title: Synchronizing nursing education and practice to improve care

Beth Ann Swan
Thomas Jefferson University, USA

Biography

Dr. Beth Ann Swan is Dean at the Jefferson College of Nursing at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Swan is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. She is past president of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing and a 2007-2010 Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow. Dr. Swan was a member of the Veterans Health Administration Choice Act Blue Ribbon Panel and is a member of the Josiah Macy Jr. Planning Committee for Preparing Registered Nurses for New Roles in Primary Care. She also served as an Honorary Visiting Expert, Health Manpower Development Plan (HMDP) for the Ministry of Health, Singapore.Dr. Swan has a distinguished record of extramural funding, publications, and presentations nationally and internationally.

Abstract

Healthcare reform and changing population health demographics call for a radical transformation in healthcare delivery and the education of healthcare providers. Nurses comprise the largest proportion of healthcare providers making it necessary to ensure that they are prepared to address the challenges that arise from the evolving healthcare delivery system. A key message of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM, 2011) The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, is that nurses must lead healthcare change. To accomplish this, leaders in nursing education and nursing practice must recognize their role in creating change in nursing education and practice. Specifically, they must recognize their role in forming partnerships to improve nursing education and nursing practice. In this context, this presentation will share two exemplarsof the future of nursing education in synchronizing education and all aspects of practice to improve care for individuals and families. The first exemplar with describean innovative baccalaureate nursing curriculum based on One Jefferson’s mission, Health is All We Do and JCN’s curriculum for health is H.E.R.E. – Humanistic, Evidence-based, Reflective, and Excellence in clinical leaders. The curricular framework that guides the newly designed concept-based baccalaureate curriculum is Promoting Health and Quality of Life Along the Care Continuum. This framework emphasizes the promotion of health and quality of life in a variety of populations during transitions of care from one setting to another and is guided by the curricular themes of innovation, population health, interprofessional collaboration, and practice excellence. Central to the curriculum is the need to leverage partnerships to support the newly developed course offerings, immersion experiences (formerly clinical experiences), service learning, and experiential opportunities in interprofessional, community-based primary care. These partnerships are mutually beneficial to promote health and foster cross sector collaboration to improve well-being. The second exemplar, Communication Catalyst Program, will illustrate an academic-practice partnership that is transforming the care transitions experience through nurse-patient communication. In addition, a March 2016 national report from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing titled Advancing Healthcare Transformation: A New Era for Academic Nursingwill be discussed. This report addresses how collaborative work is needed to spark clinical innovation and align critical resources to transform healthcare delivery.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
11:15 - 11:45

Title: 3D anatomy models and impact on learning: critical assessment of the quality of literature

Samy A. Azer
King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Biography

Professor Samy Azer is an Australian physician and medical academic and educator. He was honoured to contribute to medical education in several countries. He graduated with a Bachelor in Medicine and Surgery and completed his training in gastroenterology and hepatology in the 80s. He obtained PhD from the University of Sydney in hepatology and a Master in Education from the University of New South Wales. He is a Fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology and obtained a Master of Public Health from the University of New South Wales. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. He was a Senior Lecturer in Medical Education at the University of Sydney from 1997 to 1998 at that time the university was introducing a new PBL program. Then he was invited to join the University of Melbourne from 1999 to 2006 to support the team in medical education unit introducing the new PBL program and changing the curriculum. He is a Visiting Professor of Medical Education at the University of Toyama, Japan and has helped the Faculty of Medicine in establishing its Medical Education Unit. He was Professor of Medical Education and Chair of Medical Education Research and Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, UniversitiTeknologi MARA, Malaysia from 2007 to 2009. During that time he was a key element in helping the Faculty to be ready and prepared for accreditation of its program. The program was credited for 5 years and the university was the first to be credited in Malaysia. Professor Azer was a consultant to the Victorian Postgraduate Medical Foundation (VMPF), Australia. He is Professor of Medical Education and the Chair of Curriculum and Research Unit at King Saud University College of Medicine and has played a significant role in introducing the new curriculum and preparing the College for accreditation. The program was accredited for 7 years in 2011. Professor Azer has been invited as a keynote speaker to conferences in Australia, South East Asia, Sweden, Turkey, the Middle East countries and the United States. He has over 100 original articles published in international journals most of them are on medical education. He authored four textbooks on Medical Education. He is Editor at PLOS ONE, United States, Editor at MEDICINE, the United States, and on the Editorial Board of BMC Medical Education, the United Kingdom, and a Topic Editor of Frontiers in Medicine, a partner of Nature Group, Switzerland.

Abstract

Background:The aims of this study were to identify studies exploring three-dimensional (3D) anatomy models and their impact on learning, and to assess the quality of research in this area. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Web of Knowledge databases were searched using the following keywords "3D anatomy", "three dimensional anatomy," "3D virtual reality anatomy," "3D VR anatomy," "3D anatomy model, “3D anatomy teaching", and “anatomy learning VR” . Three evaluators independently assessed the quality of research using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Results: Of the 94,616 studies identified initially, 30 studies reported data on the impact of using 3D anatomy models on learning. The majority were of moderate quality with a mean MERSQI score=10.26 (SD 2.14, range 6.0–13.5). The rater intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.75–0.88). Most studies were from North America (53%), and Europe (33%) and the majority were from medical (73%) and Dental (17%) schools. Conclusions: There was no solid evidence that the use of 3D models is superior to traditional teaching. However, the studies varied in research quality. More studies are needed, particularly from nursing, to examine the short- and long-term impacts of 3D models on learning using valid and appropriate tools.

Sessions:
Community health nursing
Recent advances in nursing research
Oncology nursing

Time:

Title: Title

Name
Affilation

Biography

Biogrphy

Abstract

Abstract

Time:
11:45 - 12:05

Title: Advances in Nursing Research: Big Data Analytics the Future

Phyllis Hansell
Seton Hall University, USA

Biography

Dr. Shanley is a Professor in the department of nursing at the Seton Hall University College of Nursing. She graduated from the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing in New York and received master's and doctor's degrees in nursing from Columbia University.

Abstract

Big data analytics is the analytical process through which investigators examine large sets of data to find the answers to relevant research questions or hypotheses. These large data sets are readily available through found data from a variety of sources. Especially important for nurse investigators to consider is the vast amounts of data generated through sources such as the electronic medical record, Medicaid/ Medicare data. Typically Big Data is defined as data sets that are too large to be managed by typical computer systems Data analytics demand the team approach including: Health Professionals (Nurses, Physicians, and Dentists), Statisticians, Information Technology experts. The inter-professional approach to Big Data issues has the potential to identify and solve healthcare problems that were not before possible The specific purpose of Big Data Analytics is to examine large sets of data to identify and uncover hidden patterns, new correlations, market trends, preferences and patient care outcomes. Unique characteristics of Big Data include: high volume; high variety whereby innovative forms of innovative arise. Big Data analytics can be used to answer important questions related to patterns of prevention, patient care outcomes to name a few. Some of the benefits of big data include: cost savings, competitive advantage along with new business opportunities. Big Data provides an accessible source of rich data that can many answer many important patient care questions. The nurse investigator is key to the effective use of Big Data through the generation of important questions and hypotheses whereby results from robust samples are set in the framework of the scientific data base which builds to answer further research questions. Although Big Data Analytics did not exist in the time of Nightingale who was a statistician and the first nurse researcher, it is important to recognize that she effectively used statistical methods to identify important patterns to manage and prevent disease. Big Data analytics have great potential for the future of nursing research and will do much for the advancement of nursing science.

Time:
12:05 - 12:25

Title: Post discharge pain experience following primary total hip or total knee arthroplasty in patients whose primary language is Not English

Yvonne Ramlall
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Canada

Biography

A Registered Practical Nurse(RPN) working on an acute surgical floor for 15+ years at the Holland Centre of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre(HC/SHSC). A preceptor, mentor/resource nurse to new graduates. Completed the RPNAO Leadership/Clinical Practice Fellowship in 2007 and a follow-up study in 2009. Both were published in the International Journal Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing (IJOTN. Nominated for the 2015 Nursing Hero Award. Awarded the 2014-2015 Canadian Orthopaedic Association Literary Award , the 2014 Dr. Robert Salter Award and the Suzanne & William Holland Health Professional MSK Award, June 2014.Sunnybrook sSchulich Award for Nursing and Clinical Excellence in 2009. An Executive Board Member of the Toronto Chapter of Canadian Orthopaedic Nurses Association (CONA). Presented the studies across Canada and Internationally at various OrthopaedicConferences inDublin, Ireland; Bristol, England; Qawra, Malta; Melbourne, Australia and at the 4th World Congress of Regional Anesthesia &Pain Therapy in Capetown, South Africa, Nov.2014.

Abstract

Pain following total hip or total knee arthroplasty following discharge from hospital is not well understood, especially inpatients whose primary language is not English. The objective of this study was to review how communication barrier impact the understanding of and reporting of pain levels, rather than whether non-English speaking patients actually experience different pain levels. Purpose: The purpose of the study was:(1) To determine pain scores of the patients upon discharge from acute care; (2) Assess what level of pain scores were satisfactory; (3) Assess the number of prescribed pain tablets taken; (4)Assess the association between pain score and the number of tablets controlling for age and gender and (5) To determine whether the patients were satisfied with their ability to communicate their pain control needs, describe their satisfaction and to say how to improve pain control. Method: Consent was obtained in the presence of a substitute decision maker. Ethics approval was obtained. Patients were presented with a Study Instruction Sheet. The sheet provided directions surrounding the completion of the Pain Self-Assessment Form (PSAF). Pain scores were measured 3 times/day with an average daily score for 5 days. Result: Of the 22/143 patients who met the criteria, 20 consented and 2 declined. The overall response rate was 18/19 = 94.7%.Fifty-six percent of patients were satisfied with pain control. Fifty percent reported nausea; 28%reported dizziness and sweating; 22% reported constipation. Thirty-nine percent needed an interpreter. Conclusion: Post-operative pain control is important to both patients and health care professionals. The most common recommendation was to use a translator. Impaired communication through language barriers complicates the caring process even more. Information from this study will improve discharge teachings.

Time:
12:25 - 12:45

Title: Meeting health care needs of women: Screening and management of cervical health in community based out patient clinics

Michael Jacqueline Lall
University of Texas at Arlington, USA

Biography

Jackie L. Michael, RN, PhD, APRN, WHNP-BC hasbeen a Registered Nurse for 28 years and a Womens Health Nurse Practitioner for 22 years. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing and Health Innovation and a Womans Health Nurse Practitioner II for Parkland Health and Hospital System. She designs online courses. She has practiced as a Nurse Colposcopist and serves as a Legal Nurse Consultant and expert witness. She has many presentations, papers, and posters to her credit. Dr. Michael leadership includes Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing DT-102 President, National Association of Indian Nurses of America Executive VP, Indian American Nurses Association of North Texas Past President and Advisory Committee Chair, Texas Nurses Association District 4 Board of Directors, TNA D4 Mock Trial Committee, and Elsevier Foundations Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy Program mentor.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: This presentation will discuss innovative methods created to provide access to health to women of all ages through Community based Out Patient Clinics (COPC). Women of all ages deserve a good quality of life throughout their lifespan. Access to care in community based outpatient clinics is becoming the new standard of practice. Cervical cancer is one of the worlds deadliest but most easily preventable forms of cancer for women, responsible for more than 270 000 deaths annually, 85% of which occur in developing countries (WHO, 2016). Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of cervical cancers worldwide (CDC. 2016) This presentation is designed for beginner, intermediate and experienced health care providers who serve women as primary care or specialist providers as they are in the best position to influence health care decisions by providing accurate and current evidenced based information to their clients. Presentation will compare and contrast national cervical cytological screening guidelines as they have been revised and yet practitioners are not able to agree on the consensus reports for screening and management of Pap smear guidelines. The role of protocols to understand interpretation guidelines for Pap smears for consistent management of womens health will be discussed in detail. Author will Summarize key points onpatient preparation for the pelvic exam and review the steps involved in performing a pelvic examination, including identifying external and internal structures associated with the pelvic exam.Describe the indications and complications of performing a pelvic exam will be discussed along with strategies to limit negative outcomes and make the visit a positive and non-threatening experience for women.Author will elaborate on management of abnormal Pap smear results and the management on COPC setting so women do not fall through the cracks for treatment and management of abnormal Pap smear results. Quality care strategies, indices, processes, benefits and limitations of womens health beginning from the initial exam with Pap smear screening and management will be shared with the audience.

Time:
12:45 - 13:05

Title: Critical illness - healthpromoting conversation for families

Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Linkoping University, Sweden

Biography

Gunilla Hollman Frisman, is CCRN, PhD and Associate professor at the Department of Nursing, the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Linkoping, Sweden.She is responsible for the Specialist Nursing Programme in Intensive Care, on advanced level. She is a tutor to three doctoral students and also tutoring clinical scientific projects as she also has a clinical position at the University hospital of Linkoping, Sweden.

Abstract

Introduction: Families having a family member with critical illness in an intensive care unit face a demanding situation, threatening the normal functioning of the family. Family members often suffer from anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress syndrome longer compared to the patient being critical ill. In order to gain a better understanding of family adaptation andthe family as a unit, the experience of each family member needs to be acknowledged. Still, there is a knowledge gap regarding the family members wellbeing during and after critical illness. Aim: To investigate outcomes of a nurse led intervention, Health promoting conversations with families on family functioning and wellbeing in families with a member who had been critical ill. Methods: Families were randomized to health promoting conversations or ordinary care. Twelve qualitative interviews with family members (n=15)who have had a family member with critical illness and had got health promoting conversations was performed. Inclusion criteria were patients with a minimum of 72 hours at the ICU, and at least one family member (>15 years) interested to participate in the study. The interviews were analyzed with content analyze. Results: Family members experienced strengthen togetherness, a caring attitude and confirmation through the health promoting conversations. The caring and calming conversations were appreciated although exhausting feelings came up again. Working through the experience and being confirmed promoted their wellbeing. Conclusions: Health promoting conversations were considered to be healing as the family members take part of each other’s feelings, thoughts and experiences of the critical illness.

Time:
13:50 - 14:10

Title: Coordinating care and managing transitions in community health nursing: The value proposition

Beth Ann Swan
Thomas Jefferson University, USA

Biography

Dr. Beth Ann Swan is Dean at the Jefferson College of Nursing at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Swan is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. She is past president of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing and a 2007-2010 Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow. Dr. Swan was a member of the Veterans Health Administration Choice Act Blue Ribbon Panel and is a member of the Josiah Macy Jr. Planning Committee for Preparing Registered Nurses for New Roles in Primary Care. She also served as an Honorary Visiting Expert, Health Manpower Development Plan (HMDP) for the Ministry of Health, Singapore.Dr. Swan has a distinguished record of extramural funding, publications, and presentations nationally and internationally.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Healthcare changes over the past few years have challenged the health care system to find ways to manage the complex health needs of individuals and the population by increasing access to care and managing costs while providing the highest quality of care. Safe, efficient and effective transitions between providers, levels of care, and various care settings will be key factors for success. The Affordable Care Act (2010) established provisions for Patient-Centered Medical Homes and Accountable Care Organizations where care coordination and transition management are methods to provide safe, high quality care to at-risk populations, such as patients with complex chronic conditions. In an era where cutting costs and registered nurses from community health settings is prevalent; three areas for development are: 1) a model for registered nurse care coordination and transition management (RN in CCTM) with high risk patients; 2) measures to track the impact of the RN in CCTM and; 3) methods to explicate the value proposition for deployment of community health RNs. The work of registered nurses has been invisible due to insufficient documentation and absence of process and outcome performance measures. A logic model, was developed to delineate, dimensions of the RN in CCTM role; activities, short, medium, and long term outcomes of each dimension and to specify measures and the value proposition for the RN-CCTM as part of an interprofessional team in the community. Uses of the logic model for the RN in CCTM and their contributions to individual, family, and community outcomes will be presented. Use of the logic model for the RN in CCTM in development of a business case for investment in registered nurses doing CCTM will also be delineated. As much of the needed care and services are delivered beyond the hospital walls in the community, community health nurses are well-positioned to advocate for and provide care coordination and transition management. This presentation will discuss: 1) processes of developing and using a logic model to capture impact and value of care coordination and transition management in community health nursing, and 2) use of the logic model in developing a business case for investment in registered nurses doing care coordination and transition management in community health nursing.

Time:
14:10 - 14:30

Title: Cultural perception of arab american muslims parent about healthy eating and physical activity for their school age children

Khlood Salman
Duquesne University, USA

Biography

Dr. Salman is specialized in Community and Public Health, with a clinical background in Medical Surgical Nursing. She earned MSN and Dr.PH degrees from the School of Nursing, and Graduate School of Public health at the University of Pittsburgh. Currently, she is a full time faculty member of School of Nursing at Duquesne University. She teaches at the graduate and undergraduate levels, her courses focus on population based health promotion. Her scholarly work focuses on health promotion and disease prevention in communities with different cultural and religious background including immigrant and refugee population, international health, and environmental health. She is a very active member in the local community, serves as an advisory member for the Department of Human Services (DHS),a member in the Immunization Coalition of the Allegheny County, and a board member in the Islamic center of Pittsburgh

Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of research related to the impact of traditional diet, physical activity, cultural and religious beliefs on childhood overweight and obesity among Arab Muslim immigrant school age children in the U.S. Purpose: The study was conducted for the following purposes: 1. To explorecultural perceptions, values and beliefs of Arab American Muslim parents or guardians of school-age children (11-14) about healthy eating and physical activity; 2.To determine the cultural perceptions, values and beliefs of Arab American Muslim parents of school-age children (ages 11-14) about healthy eating for their children; and 3. To identify the role of health care professionals in promoting culturally congruent healthy eating and activity for the school-age children (ages 11-14) through the collaborative efforts with their parents and schools. Method: A focused ethnographic approach was used.A semi-structured and open-ended interview guide was designedto investigate and understandpotential cultural and religious perceptions, values and beliefs on eating and physical activity habits for Arab American Muslim parents or guardians and their children. Participants: A total of 32 Arab Muslim informants (parents and/orguardians) were recruited from three Islamic schools located in the Northeastern U.S. Five focus groups were conducted for data collection. Focus groups included five to 10 informantswho have resided in the United States for an average of 18 years. Data Analysis: Data was analyzed using Leininger’s four phases of qualitative data analysis. Findings:Four major themes were identified:(1) Homemade meals are healthier; (2) Arab American parents are responsible for their children’s health habits; (3) Positive and negative environmental influences affect children’s health habits; and (4) Cultural beliefs conflict with American customs. Conclusion:Findings from this study suggest the importance of collaboration between schools, health care providers and parents to design and implement a culturally-tailored intervention that focus on education regarding healthy eating habits, and daily physical activitiesfor Arab American Muslim children. In the future it will become increasingly useful and importantto incorporate technological resources to promote healthy eating and activity behavior for Arab American Muslim children. Implication: Nurses and other public health care practitioners (HCP)can use this knowledge to play a proactive role in developing culturally targeted and culturally tailored interventions focusing on the health and well being of American-Arab Muslim children.

Time:
14:30 - 14:50

Title: Developing multiple program for promoting family health with a vulnerable child

Jih-Yuan Chen
Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan

Biography

Jih-Yuan Chen completed her PhD in Nursing at University of San Diego, USA. She has been an Associate Professor at Kaohsiung Medical University, School of Nursing, since 1984. She has presented papers at international conference and published more than 49 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute and several journals’ member of reviewer. She focused on the concept of family health promotion from several different perspective, like family hardiness, family support, family health, family resilience (family function), family health lifestyles in families of children with vulnerability, role strain and morale, model testing, developing of Instrument.

Abstract

Vulnerable children in this study included the disabled children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)/spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or chromosome abnormality. The vulnerable situations exhibited relatively disability/worse health problemand caused problems regarding families’ health issues and general dysfunctional family support. Policy programs for the vulnerable could be created and changed as depending that influenced families’ perception of their health and family support. Therefore, empirical evidence to guide health professional to provide family health promotion that included five previous studies to determined relationship between families’ perception of health andsupport, predictors of family function,the demographic predictors of lower health promotion lifestyles scores, to test the family health promotion model and the model of family resource and health perspective of children. In addition, after reestablished measurement tools for evaluating of promoting family health program.The purpose of the study were to rechecked to compare the differences of family health needs, health capacities, health behaviors and health status amongfamily members and the difference disease groups. As well as analyzing the predictors influence on previous variables. Measurement tools included health needs assessment, family health behaviors, family health capacities, and family adaptation and coherence measurement, family health status, and family structural analysis. First, randomly selected 180 families, including 59 of DMD/SMA, 76 of ADHD, and 45 of Turner syndrome familysubjects from 286 families that had been recruited in constructing of the model of family health promotion. There were no significant differences of different family variables among the different disease types and different family members. Analysis data with combined these disease groups of 180, the results presented: family monthly income was the predictor of influencing on family hardiness, family behaviors, family general function, and duke health assessment. Family monthly income and power to propose an idea/suggest were the factors influenced on general family function through family hardiness and family support. Data from these previous families randomly selectedwho agreed to participate health promotion programs of91 for the proposed study. The results presented significant differences among four clinics/setting for the subscales of anxiety, anxiety-depression, and resolve, and the health concept practice,especially in lower score of health concept practice of ADHD group than the chromosome abnormality group.Multiple discipline professional design family health promotion with nature-based and socio-ecological model of health promotionto decrease of anxiety and depression and increase of resolve ability.

Time:
14:50 - 15:10

Title: Development and validation of a questionnaire on the model of stages of the transition process of womens health with breast cancer

Maude Hebert
University of Quebec in Trois-Rivieres, Canada

Biography

Maude Hébert R.N. Ph.D. is Professor at the University of Québec in Trois-Rivières. She did her graduate studies withwomendiagnosed ofbreast cancer.She teaches research methodology and therapeutic relationship. Her research interests cover the concept of transition between health and illness and the perceptions of health and illness in the population in oncology.

Abstract

The studies of women with breast cancer have focused on the transition between health and disease without relating the transition to the steps of a complete process (McCann et al, 2010; McCorry et al, 2013). Hébert, Gallagher and St-Cyr Tribble (2015) identified that women with breast cancer through four iterative steps (react emotionally, face the situation, construct a new identity, react to the social representations of cancer) and five sub-stages from diagnosis until the energy level is back after the end of treatments. However, we do not know where are the women with cancer in their illness trajectory. This causes care and education that are not based on the patient centered care philosophy minimizing their recovery (Hébert, Gallagher & St-Cyr Tribble, 2015; Meleis, 2010). A questionnaire on the stages of the health status perceptions transition process would locate women with cancer in all stages of the illness trajectory and guide nurses with appropriate interventions at each stage. Objectives: This study aims the creation and validation of a questionnaire to locate the women with breast cancer in each of the four stages and the five sub-phases to allow nurses to place their clients in the process of transition and thereby reduce their psychological distress. Method: Metrological Study: Step 1: General description of the measurement tool. Step 2: Planning, operationalization and validation of the questionnaire (pre-test and test-retest). Expected benefits: A questionnaire situating women with breast cancer in stages of the cancer trajectory will a) offer a better understanding of the steps that occur after a breast cancer diagnosis, b) integrate current knowledge on perceptions of health and illness as well as the role of the individual and c) direct clinical interventions and evaluate their effectiveness.

Time:
15:10 - 15:30

Title: Breast cancer screening rates, behaviors, and attitudes among three arab american women subgroups

Manal Alatrash
Western University of Health Sciences/College of Graduate Nursing, USA

Biography

Dr. Manal Alatrash is an Associate Professor of Western University of Health Sciences/ College of Graduate Nursing. She received her doctoral degree (PhD) in Nursing from Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, California. Her doctorate research focus is on breast cancer screening in Arab American women in order to decrease health disparities in the United States. She obtained her Master’s degree in nursing from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. where she majored in Adult Oncology Nursing. She received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Jordan University in Jordan.

Abstract

Background Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer among women in the United States. Mammography screening has been identified as a valuable tool to decrease morbidity and mortality rates from breast cancer. Although the effect of screening with mammography on mortality and morbidity is debatable, it is recommended that mammograms should be continued annually regardless of the age of the woman. Racial disparities in health in the US continue to affect breast cancer screening and early diagnosis even if socioeconomic status is controlled. Arab Muslim and Christian women from different Arab countries may perceive health and screening practices differently. Although general cultural themes can be established, the variations that exist between and within national groups of Arabs, such as country of origin and religion, are important aspects must be considered in the healthcare system to reduce racial disparities and ensure social justice. Purpose: To explore breast cancer screening rates in Arab Christian and Muslim American women from three Arab countries: Lebanon, Jordan, and Egypt, and to investigate differences in attitudes and beliefs about breast cancer screening among these three subpopulations. Method In this comparative, cross sectional study, 316 Arab American women from the three Arab countries completed a survey that combined the sociodemographic variables and the Arab Specific-Culture Barriers instrument. Pender’s Health Promotion Model was employed to guide the exploration of different biopsychosocial variables in relation to mammography screening. Results The results of this study revealed lower mammography screening rates among the three Arab American subpopulations compared to the national screening rate of 67% among all women aged 40 and older in the United States. Of the 316 AAW, 202 (63.9%) reported ever having a mammogram. Having ever had a clinical breast exam (CBE) was reported to be done by 78 (84.8%) women from Lebanon, 81 (76.4%) from Egypt, and 75 (63.6%) from Jordan. Of those women, 80 (77.7%) were Christian, and 154 (72.3%) were Muslim. Performing breast self exam (BSE) was reported by 63 (68.5%) women from Lebanon, 66 (55.9%) from Jordan, and 57 (53.8%) from Egypt. Sixty-one (59.2%) Christian and 125 (58.7%) Muslim women reported performing BSE. This study presented numerous perceived benefits, barriers, and interpersonal influences on BC screening; it also revealed important differences in mammography screening behaviors among the three subgroups of AAW, Lebanese, Jordanian, and Egyptian, based on religion and country of birth. Several variables influencing utilization of mammography screening were proposed. These variables included sociodemographic characteristics, age, country of birth, religion, marital status, and living status (whether or not the woman lived alone), perceived benefits, barriers, and interpersonal influences. The implications of such findings are significant to nursing practice, knowledge development, and research. Conclusion Mammography screening rates in AAW are still lower than those of other ethnic women in the US; therefore, additional efforts are to be made to overcome barriers and motivate these women to make a decision of participating and adhering to BC screening. Influences of religion and culture were addressed in this study which indicated that both of these factors should be taken into consideration when educating AAW about mammography screening. Future endeavors must be made to increase knowledge of AAW about BC sc

Time:
15:30 - 15:50

Title: Using feedback to promote learning at college of health sciences: Nursing student and faculty perspectives

Muyssar Sabri Awadhalla
University of Bahrain, Bahrain

Biography

She is Head, Nursing Department, and Director WHO Collaborating Center for Nursing Development at College of Health Sciences-University of Bahrain, holding Master degree in Acute Adult Care-oncology from Jordan University of Sciences and Technology, and post graduate Diploma in Health Care Management from RCSI. She is a member in the Gulf Cooperation Council Technical Committee on Nursing, member in the Arab Board for nursing and Midwifery specialization and member in the National Health Regulatory Authority board exam. Worked as a subject expert with Higher Education Quality Assurance Authority in Bahrain. She was hired as a consultant to develop, review nursing curriculum and as an external examiner. Interested in nursing education and oncology research. Active nationally in improving the nursing education and contributes to upgrade the standard of nursing education and services provided by qualified nurses in Bahrain. Received national education achievement awards, and Award of King Abdulla the second University Hospital-Jordan, 2002, and award of excellence from JUST best university graduates leader, 2007.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Providing learners with a feedback is an essential component of the assessment in any teaching learning process. It is a powerful mechanism for enhancing students’ learning skills and motivation. The aim of this study is to investigate the students and faculty’s perception of the usefulness of feedback, and to assess the quality of the given feedback on students’ performance. One hundred and six nursing students and all faculty teaching in BSN program participated in this study by filling in a questionnaire consisting of 17 items. Three major aspects related to feedback were examined: quality of feedback, improvement of performance based on the provided feedback, and need for feedback. The results revealed that students strongly believe that feedback improve their learning skills as well as their performance in the course. In addition, the majority of them agreed that they need feedback to revise for exams and to improve their grades and the experienced faculty see the feedback in more essential than others. In conclusion, the study indicated that faculty and students perceived feedback as an important factor in the quality of education. What will the audience take away from your presentation? • The value of giving feedback to students • This will help the nursing educators to improve the quality of nursing education hence; this will improve the nursing outcomes in a design problem.

Time:
15:50 - 16:10

Title: Vision and Deaf Awareness Training is it App.ropriate?

Susan Carlisle
Queen's University Belfast, UK

Biography

Susan Carlisle is a Lecturer in the school of Nursing and Midwifery at the Queen's University Belfast. She has published many articles in different journals.

Abstract

Some of our most vulnerable patients/ clients have a sensory deficit. An app which focused on patients with a vision and/or hearing loss was developed as an aid memoire for nursing students on placement. The intent was to embed the core values necessary for students to provide appropriate care for patients with a sensory deficit. Nursing students at Queen’s University Belfast attend a sensory awareness day during year one facilitated by RNIB and a Deaf Trainer. The evaluations taken following these events have been extremely positive with many students commenting on the insight they gained from listening to speakers and their lived experiences. This success encouraged us to consider ways of improving and developing this awareness further. It was apparent that the most efficient, effective and practical way would be to engage in technology enhanced learning. The result was the development of a mobile software application (app) which utilised a teaching tool template with the essential aspects required for sensory awareness training. Sponsorship to develop the app was awarded by the Martha McMenamin fund. This app is specifically designed to provide information and advice for nursing students working with patients/ clients with a sensory impairment. To ensure that this was created using a person centred approach our service users were involved from the innovations inception through to its evaluation. Overall nursing students positively evaluated the app. Qualitative evidence from service users and practice partnerships was extremely positive. Although initially created for nursing students it is applicable for all those engaged in healthcare. It is hoped that further implementation of the app will show an improved quality to the care delivered to those with a sensory deficit. We believe that by working in partnership with service users we have helped to create an innovative tool that benefits both staff and patients.

Time:
16:25 - 16:45

Title: Comparative study between primigravida and multigravida regarding women's self-care practices for management of selected minor discomfort

GamilaG.Ayoub
Menofia University, Egypt

Biography

GamilaG.Ayoub is working as a Lecturer in Maternity and Newborn nursing health nursing at Menofia University, Egypt.

Abstract

Self-care means a person’s ability to undertake self-care requisites or needs for preserving health and well-being. During pregnancy, the rapidly rising hormones change the maternal body and may cause some symptoms in the mother called as minor disorders. Aim of this study was to compare between primigravida and multigravida regarding women's self-care practices for management of selected minor discomfort. Research question of this study are women’s self-care practices differs between primigravida and multigravida toward managementof selected minor discomforts during pregnancy? Research Design for this study was correlational descriptive. Setting of this study was conducted in the keebly MCH at Menofya governorate in Egypt. Subjects and methods: convenient sample was used to collect data in a period of six months, two days / week (Monday and Wednesday) and started from March 2016, until August 2016,and the total number was 300 pregnant women for three trimesters (90primigravida and 210 multigravida, two tools for data collection was structured first; interviewing questionnaire sheet, andsecond; minor discomforts assessment sheet. Results of the study revealed that the majority of both primigavida and multigravida (85.6%, 87.1% respectively) were housewives, while (33.3%) of the primigavida had moderate education compared to (21.4%) among multigravida. More than half of the primigavida (54.4%)women suffered from nausea and vomiting compared to (65.2 %) among multigravida. Less than half of the primigravida (42.9%) attempts to manage it by avoid food smelling compared (26.3%) among multigravida. Additionally (52.2%) of primigravida complaining from heartburn compared to (40.5%) among multigravida, more than half of both groups (55.3%primi,54.1%multi)avoid fried ,spicy, and fatty food as a one method to manage that complain. Also (60%primi, 76.7% multi) suffering from frequency of micturition. More than half (51.9%) of the primigravida utilize regular evacuation of bladder every two hours for managing of this complain, while less than half (44.1%) of multi gravida women perform decrease amount of drinking especially at night for coping this complain.(61.1%primi, 41.4% multi) were suffering from back pain. More than two thirds (65.5%) of the primigravida women avoid standing for long time for manage this discomfort compared to (46.1 %) among multigravida. Most of them (87.8% primi, 84.8% multi) were suffering from leucorrhea. However (84.8% primi, 83.3% multi) were suffering from sleeping disturbance Conclusion: There was no significant difference between primigravida and multigravida mothers' self- care practice for management of some selected minor discomforts during pregnancy such as (constipation, heartburn, backache, leucorrhea ). Recommendations: Establishing educational program for all pregnant women's about minor discomforts & its correct self-care practice intended for increasing their knowledge through using health booklets, posters. Key Words: minor discomforts, self-care practice, and pregnant women.

Time:
16:45 - 17:05

Title: Family function after cochlear implant surgery

Mina Moradi
Islamic Azad University, Iran

Biography

I have completed my bachelors from Zanjan University of medical sciences with title of top student and I completed my master of Science in medical surgical nursing in Tehran University of medical sciences, I am PhD student in University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. I worked as faculty member at Zanjan University of medical sciences about 3 years 2011-2013, and now I works as faculty member of Department of Nursing, Tehran Medical sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Introduction: The family is not only the basic unit of society, but it is an important place for a person's physical and mental development. Family Function is what the family as a unit do it , that contains interact and manipulate the environment to solve problems. Family function is one of the most important indicators of quality of life and mental health of family members. Family has known as a vital element in the success of cochlear implantation. Method: A search of 4 databases covering English and Iranian language publications since 2004-2015 was undertaken which identified 15 papers. Results: The quality of mother-child interactions, framework of mother ,speech, speaking in home environment, support of child ,Family structure , education, social and economic status of families have an impact the outcome of cochlear implant surgery. Conclusion: Family function directly affects the outcome of cochlear implant, with knowledge and improve family functioning after cochlear implant surgery can be achieved better results after surgery.

Time:
17:05 - 17:25

Title: Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the critical care family needs inventory in the cardiac care units (CCU)

Razieh Bandari
Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Biography

She has completed his MSc from Research center for Social Determinants of Helath, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. At present, she is doing his Phd in the same university.

Abstract

Purpose: Life-threatening illness and later hospitalization in an intensive care unit in the hospital often occur unexpectedly without any warning and no time for the patients and their families to prepare and get ready. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the of the critical care family needs inventory (CCFNI) in the cardiac care units (CCU). Methods: This study was conducted as a cross-sectional research. The main sample comprised 450 family members of hospitalized patients in the CCUs of the hospitals in Semnan, Iran. Participants were randomly selected to evaluate the instrument in terms of construct and convergent validity. The internal consistency of the translated instrument was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Results:In line with the original instrument, five different components were extracted from the CCFNI-P, which accounted for more than 53.5% of the total variance. The correlation between the total score for the instrument and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory criterion was positive and significant (r = 0.66, p = 0.03). The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the entire instrument was 0.94 and more than 0.70 for all dimensions. Conclusions: This study confirmed the validity of the CCFNI-P in terms of face validity, construct, and convergent and it showed an acceptable internal consistency. The CCFNI-P is suitable for investigating the needs of Iranians . Key words: Family, needs assessment, cardiac care units, questionnaire, psychometrics.

Sessions:
Poster presentations

Time:

Title: Determinants of workplace stress in affecting stress of conscience among nurses working in acute settings

Muder Alkrisat
Chamberlain College of Nursing, USA

Biography

Muder Alkrisat is an Associate Professor of Chamberlain College of Nursing. He completed his doctoral degree in Nursing from Azusa Pacific University. His focus are work place conditions and patient safety, he completed his dissertation on impact of workplace stress in acute settings. He received his Bachelor of Science in nursing and Master in nursing from Jordan University. In 2000, he received two years of training with Natal University in South Africa with research proposals on the “Role of the Facilitator in Case Based and Experiential Learning”. In 2012 he also received extensive training Quality Matter. In 2014-2016 he received extensive training in competency based training to participate actively in curriculum development for BSN-MSN. His extensive clinical experience spans multiple health care settings, including acute care facilities, specialty and long term facilities, and community-based clinics. He has held a variety of practice and leadership roles in these settings and has been actively involved in local and regional health initiatives. His extensive background in quality, Risk management compliance and regulatory arena helped him to serve for many years as corporate director for Clinical processes (quality, Infection control, Education and Risk Management). He is certified in Six Sigma Black Belt and lean thinking (CSSBB), Certified Performance Improvement Advisor (PIA), Certified Specialist in Healthcare Accreditation (CSHA) and Certified Healthcare Specialist Accreditation (HACP). Dr. Alkrisat is a Subject Matter Expert in the MSN and teaches health policy, healthcare economics and healthcare policy and leadership courses in the MSN program. His current research and policy interests include examining the relationships between structures, processes, and outcomes of acute settings, with an emphasis on work place conditions and parent-provider interaction and patient safety, andthe impact of legislative and regulatory change on the delivery of health services.

Abstract

Background Workload stress has a great impact on workforce, which suggests that intensity and frequency of stress contributes to the cumulative effects of workplace stressors. Nurses in acute healthcare systems are predisposed to work-related stress based on moral factors. Stress results when nurses are exposed to ambiguous moral situations, they experience distress when they face a situation with contradictory demands or are hindered to take actions that they experience as ethically demanding. Nurses who have high moral sensitivity will experience ethical demands that may give them a bad conscience when they do not act in accordance with these demands. Such experiences have been described as stress of conscience because they give rise to a troubled conscience. Purpose: To assess the level of stress of conscience of nurses in acute settings, identify situations that result in high levels of moral distress, explore implications of moral distress, and evaluate associations among moral distress and the characteristics of nurses. Method A correlational, cross-sectional design was used in this study to examine the predictive relationship between levels of stress of conscience and workplace stressors among nurses working in acute hospitals. Results Data were analyzed from 199 nurses licensed. Correlations among the variables demonstrated a moderate positive and significant relationship among Workplace stress factors and stress of conscience intensity (r = 0.46, p< .01), however, a lower significant relation was between Workplace stress variables and Stress of Conscience frequency (r = 0.19, P < 0.1). Regression analysis resulted in a model that explained approximately 53% of the total variation in Stress of Conscience intensity (R= 0.53, Adjusted R2= 0.24, P< 0.01). Conclusion Workplace stress was perceived as a constraint in the workplace environment, prohibiting nurses from acting in what they believed was the ethically correct manner, impacting their actions in relation to patient care, and provoking emotions associated with Stress of Conscience. Furthermore, there is a need for support from the managers and a supportive organization for reducing nurses’ work-related stress, which in turn can create a positive caring climate where the nurses are able to provide high quality care.

Time:

Title: Quality of life when facing a life challenge: Using parse's researchmethod

Mary Hossley
The University of Southern Mississippi, USA

Biography

Dr. Mary Hossley is an Instructor at the University of Southern Mississippi in the department of the College of Nursing. She received her Doctor of Divinity from Lift Bible Crusade College and Seminary, Incorporated, Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Dr. Hossley received her BSN from the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. She received her MSN from Alcorn State University, Natchez, Mississippi and her Post-Masters in GNP from the University of Southern Mississippi. She currently attends Walden University where she is completing DNP degree.

Abstract

There is an inadequate understanding of what the experience of quality of life is like for persons living life challenges. The purpose of this study, guided by Parse's theory, was to investigate the universal health experience of quality of life. Four middle-age African-American women diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus Type II within the past five years and who were either insulin-dependent or taking oral hypoglycemics accepted the invitation to participate in the study. Access to participants was gained through a local acquaintance network in a semi-urban community in a southern state. The study was approved by the IRB of two universities. Data consisted of tape recordings and transcripts from dialogical engagements. The process of extraction-synthesis was used to uncover the meaning of the phenomenon. Three core concepts, cherished engagements, burdens, and nurture emerged in each participant's story. There are many implications for further research from the findings of this study. The core concepts lend themselves to further inquiry using Parse's method. Further light may be shed on the study of lived experience and quality of life with people who are living challenging life situations including people of a particular culture group or age range. Further research in this area can increase knowledge about universal lived experiences, contributing new understanding of quality of life and lived experiences in the face of a life challenge, and expanding the knowledge base of the nursing discipline in general.

Time:

Title: Prediction of coronary artery disease with the assessment tool of gender, ageand type of chest-pain

Pachanat Tantikosoom
Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

Biography

Pachanat Tantikosoomis a lecturer at the Faculty of Nursing, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She obtained a doctoral degree(Ph.D)in nursing sciences in 2012. She was a visiting scholar in the school of nursing, University of Minnesota, USA in 2009, and she hadserved as Adjunct Faculty, in the school of nursing, University of Minnesota, USA from 2009 to 2012. She had to present her study at Soul, Korea in 2011. Currently, she lectures in the field of adult nursing. Her expertise and researchinterests involve patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), patients with orthopedic and Complementary care.

Abstract

This predictive study aims to determine the correlationbetween factors such as gender, age , type of chest-pain and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), and to examine the predictability of CAD using the Diamond-Forrester model. The samples were 113 patients who were diagnosed with conditions at risk cardiovascular disease and required a Coronary Angiogram (CAG) treatmentin the tertiary hospital. The instruments were: 1) the assessment of personal data, 2) Thai short-version of the Rose Angina questionnaire (content validity 0.91and reliability were 0.80), 3) Diamond-Forrester model and 4) the result of Coronary Angiogram (CAG). Data were analyzed using statistical Point biserial and Pearson correlation between gender, age, type of chest pain and coronary artery disease. Logistic model for case was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity from the Diamond-Forrester model. The 113 patients with Coronary Artery Disease consisted of 66males(58.34%) and 47 females(41.6%), with mean age group of 64.25 ±10.61(65-75 years). Thai short -version of the Rose angina questionnaire found that age and type of chest pain had a statistically significantly effects on CAD(p <.05), but gender did not. The sensitivity and specificity of the Diamond-Forrester model were 95.23% (60 out of 63 patients), and 2.00% (1 out of 50 patients) respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV) was 55.05% ,Negative predictive value (NPV) was 25.00%, and Accuracy=55.98% In conclusion, the assessment tool showed very high sensitivity (95.23%) and the prediction of coronary artery disease and low specificity (2.00%) in the non-coronary artery disease. The accuracy of CAD prediction was essential for healthcare providers to accurately diagnose CAD, identify the severity of condition, and promptly treat CAD patients. Key word : Coronary Artery Disease/ Prediction / Chest Pain/Short version Rose angina questionnaire

Time:

Title: Development of a self-care questionnaire for clinical assessment among patients with inflammatory bowel disease

Ulrica LovenWickman
Linkoping University, Sweden

Biography

Registered Nurse, MScN Ulrica LovénWickman is a PhD student at Linköping University in Sweden. She is working in the field of Primary Health Care in southeast Sweden. Her research is aboutself-care among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Her doctoral dissertation is focused on development and validation of a self-care questionnaire for patients with IBD for clinical use.

Abstract

Background: Patients with IBD live with symptoms that are both physical and psychological burdening. Patients need self-care to manage daily life. There is a lack of measures to assess self-care in patients with IBD with the intention to support and strengthen individual efforts to improve their self-care. To offer appropriate care for patients with IBD, individualized self-care advice may aim to maintain health. Objectives: The aim was to develop and evaluate the IBD Self-Care questionnaire for assessment of self-care among patients with IBD. Methods: This is a validation study applying both qualitative and quantitative methods based on recommendations for questionnaire development. An interview study on self-care in patients with IBD (n=20) was performed and opinions about items of self-care was obtained from an expert panel (n=6) and patients (n=100). Data was collected between November 2014 to April 2016 in three phases: (1) item generation based on an interview study on self-care in patients with IBD (n=20), (2) early evaluationincluding Content validity Index (CVI) was measuredby an expert panel and patients were ranking the items to consider selection of items, also cognitive interviewing was used in a pre-test to determine the usability of the questionnaireand (3) final evaluation with a pilot study (n=30) and test-retest (n=50). Test-retest stability was established after three weeks. Validity was considered through two follow-up questions. Quantitative and qualitative analyses resulted in a reduction of the items from 51 items into 9 questions and 16 quotations. Results: A total of 180 patients with IBD participated in this study, of who86 with Crohn's disease and 94with ulcerative colitis. The IBD Self-Care questionnaire consists of 9 questions and 16 quotations and the first version is developed in the Swedish language. Evidence of initial validity could be demonstrated with the involvement of an expert panel and patients with IBD. Reliability in test-retest statistics of responses on each item showed between measure 1 and 2, 78-98% conformity, except for one item (38%). Conclusion: This study contributes to an individual disease-specific assessment of self-care through the development of a new IBD Self-Care questionnaire for assessment of self-care among patients with IBD in Sweden. Further studies, prospectively are needed to test the IBD Self-Care questionnaire in a sample of English speaking participants.

Time:

Title: Staff training interventions to reduce the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia

Heeok Park
Keimyung University, South Korea

Biography

Minsuk Gang is an assistant professor in Yeungjin college of nursing, South Korea. She received Ph.D from Keimyung University, South Korea.Her interesting research area is non-pharmacological interventions to control agitation in patients with dementia. Heeok Park is an assistant professor in Keimyung University College of Nursing, South Korea. She received her PhD degree from the University of Iowa. Her interesting research area is non-pharmacological interventions to control agitation in patients with dementia

Abstract

Aim:Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are most frequent and problematic in care settings. Staff training program to understand and manage BPSD is important to increase quality of life of people of dementia and care staff. Thus, This review of the literature examines the effectiveness of staff training programs to reduce BPSD in long-term care facilities. Method:For the data collection, the electronic database(Pubmed, CINHAL, Riss, Kiss, DBpia, Google scholar) was used for searching with the key words including 'dementia', 'Alzheimer disease', 'aggression', ‘agitation’, 'Behavioral Psychological Symptoms of Dementia', ‘staff’, ‘education’ and ‘program’. Finally, a total of 19 studies were included for the analysis based on the inclusion criteria. Result:The most commonly used research design was the cluster randomized controlled trial and the most commonly used type of providing program was ‘lecture’, ‘supervision’ and ‘feedback’. More than 8 week and 11 hour in the training program were shown significant effect on BPSD. In the contents of the educational programs, the concept of dementia and BPSD, factors of BPSD, general strategy and skill to manage BPSD, nonpharmacological intervention, communication skill and changing environment were commonly included. The significant effects were shown on BPSD and staff’s management behavior with program. Conclusion:Based on the results of the review study, the future studies needed to be provided more than 10 hour, 8week and included the contents about dementia and BPSD(concept, factor, etc.), BPSD management and skill training.

Time:

Title: Effect of white noise record on alleviating the pain of new-born during invasive procedures

Senay Cetinkaya
Cukurova University

Biography

Senay (Ok) Cetinkaya, born in 1967, has completed her bachelor of nursing, master's degree, and PhD in Ege University. In 1988 she was employed as nurse in ICU at the cardiovascular surgery clinic in Ege University, at the medical faculty hospital. In the mean time she has completed her postgraduate (1991) and PhD (1999) on pediatric nursing. Following her move to Malatya due to a spouse-related transfer (1996), she was employed at the Health Colleges of Inönü (1996-2000), Selçuk (2000-2004), and Ege (2004-2007) Universities. Currently she is working at the Faculty of Health Sciences of Çukurova University, Head of the Department of Pediatric Nursing. Besides being instructor and vice-principal at the college, she has coordinated and performed in-service training programs to healthcare personnels, carried out symposium vice-presidency, assistant journal editorship and reviewing, and chair in nursing department. She has international articles (8),international boks chapters (6), translation on a vocational book (thesaurus of skills), national chapters of book (2), has led postgraduate thesis (10), research profects (3), and posted many scientific papers (30) in periodicals.

Abstract

Objectives: In painful operations like invasive procedures, it is aimed to analyse the effect ofmakingthe babies listen to white noise CD by using NIPS pain scale. Methods: This is an experimental type of research made on 60 new-borns, ranging from 0-28 days-old, 28 weeks-old and over, and coming to intensive care unit in Gaziantep CengizGökcek Maternity and Children Hospital in Turkey. Application of the study has commenced on the date of 1 November 2015 and has been completed on the date of 31 May 2016. Two groups, one is experimental and the other is control group, selected by simple random sampling have. A thirties group selected with simple random sampling which are on condition that an experimental group (being exposed to white noise) and an control group (not being exposed to any action) has composed sample of population. Babies in experimental group on invasive procedure were exposed to white noise CD. Babies were recorded while they werelistening to white noise during invasive procedure. Then, NIPS pain scale on the questionnaire form and efficiency of white noise have been evaluated by comparing the babies’ duration of crying. Results and Conclusion: Comparison of Chi-square has been made in terms of defining characteristics of the babies in control and experimental group such as gender (p:0.10), kilo (p:0.19), circumstanceof being premature and born mature (p:0.59), races (p:0.60), and type of invasive procedure (p:0.12), and a statistically significant result has not been acquired. As it is also understood from this result, both of the groups are homogeneous and between them there is not a meaningful difference which will influence reliability of study. Whether gender of babies have an impact on duration of crying has been compared, a statistically significant resulthas not been acquired (p>0.05). Apgar score believed to influence baby’s duration of crying has also been compared with variables such as head, length, kilo, birth week, delivery method of baby but statistically significant result has not been acquired (p<0.05). New-borns’ duration of crying has been found statistically significant in Independent Samples T test (p<0.05) which was performed between two independent groups with a 95% confidence interval. Duration of crying in the group being exposed towhite noise (18.20 sec) has been determined lower than that of control group (44.96 sec). In the end, usage of white noise CD on new-born during invasive procedure has been determined to be applicable. Key Words: Crying baby, Infant, Pediatric Nursing, NIPS Pain Scale. White Noise.

Time:

Title: Prevalence of interpersonal sexual abuse among married female healthcare providerskarachi, pakistan

Azmat Jehan Khan
Aga Khan University Hospital, Pakistan

Biography

I have done RM,RN,Post-RN, MScN, currently working as an Assistant Professor in Aga Khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery Karachi, for twelve years. Prior to this, I was the Head Nurse in Obs/Gyne of the Aga Khan University Hospital and also worked for ten years in the Emergency Department at the same institute. Altogether I have more than 22 years of working experience in different felids of clinical nursing, nursing education and research. My research interests are emergency nursing, women and child health issues, domestic violence and women empowerment. I have done MScN thesis on Prevalence of Domestic Violence among Married Female Healthcare Providers in Tertiary Care Hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. For which received awardThe Farida Allana Research Award from Rho Delta Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau international.

Abstract

Objective To estimate the prevalence of sexual abuse among married female healthcare (nurses and doctors) providers in tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan perpetrated by family members. Design A descriptive cross-sectional study wasdone by using a random sample technique. Setting One public and two private tertiary healthcare hospitals from Karachi, Pakistan Population 350 married female nurses and doctorswere recruited. MethodsDescriptive and unvaried statistical methods used to analyzedata. Main Outcome MeasuresParticipant’s and husband’s socio-demographic variables, types of domestic violence (DV), sexual abuse by husband and in-laws, response to sexual abuse, most frequent perpetrator, and reason of last violence. Results The study revealed that of the total sample of 350 married female nurses and doctors, 97.7%(n= 342) were reported one or more types of DV at some point in their life. Whereby, 59.6% (n= 204) reported sexual abuse by their family members at some point in their married life. Out of which mainly the husband94.6% (n=193) created sexual abuse, followed by brother in- law17.6% (n=36). Participants living in extended families [72.2% (n=26)], those who were undergraduate [50% (n=18)] and nurses [61.1% (n=22)] experienced sexual abuse by in-laws. ConclusionsIn conclusion,nurses and doctors are victims of sexual abuse, because of socio-demographic factorssuch as extended family, educated and professional. The study participants were confronting to sexual abuse as the same level as those who were uneducated and poor. DV (Prevention and Protection) Act 2012has been passed but needs strategies and commitment for enforcement. Key words Domestic violence, sexual abuse, nurses and doctors, sexual abuse by family in-laws

Time:

Title: The analyzes of the knowledge level of the nurses and midwives who have neonatal resuscitatıon education

Emra Doğan
Cukurova University, Turkey

Biography

Researcher who was born in Mersin Turkey, 1987; primary school Adanalıoglu Elementary School andhigh school education at Tevfik Sırrı GurForeign Language Weighted graduated. Shewon Karadeniz Technical Universitythe Trabzon Health School of NursingDepartment in 2005. Shegraduatedfrom Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon Health School NursingDepartment in 2009. She has beenworking as a nurse in Mersin PhysiotherapyPhysicalTherapy Center in 2009 and Ankara AnatolianHematologyandOncologyHospital in Ankara between 2010-2012.Then She has working in HealthSciencesUniversity Adana Numune Training andResearchHospital since in 2012. Currently, she is a graduatestudent in C.U. HealthSciencesInstituteNursingDepartment

Abstract

Aim: To determine the level of knowledge of nurse-midwives about neonatal resuscitation in the province, Adana-Turkey, and the education they receive is carried out to investigate the effect of their knowledge level. Materials and Methods: The research has been applied toy he nurses and midwives who work inCukurova University Balcalı Hospital, Adana Numune Training and Research Hospital, Adana Maternity and intensive care of the newborn in the Children Hospital, gynecology and maternity wards and have receive training Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) since January 2016. Before the sampling in the study, all of the universe has been included in the study. Data were collected using a questionnaire consisting of 40 questions. training related to the NRP (visual presentations, hands-on training on educational books and model) is organized 12 times in the province of Adana, it is given a place in-service training plans to this issue for arranging by The Ministry of Health for each year and in 81 province. Findings: 97.1% of the 105 people participating in the study are women. Regarding the education level, %7.6 is a graduate of Vocational School of Health, %22.9 of pre-degree, % 62.9 undergraduate, %1.9 is a graduate of the Master. It is determined that %59 of participants (62) works in the neonatal intensive care unit, %14(15) works in clinical obstetrics and gynecology, % 26.7of (28) works in the maternity ward. % 13.3of nurses and midwives 0-6 months, %21 in 6 months to 1 year, %30.5 1-3 years, %35.2 4-5 years have joined the NRP training program. Nurses and midwives, the most important and effective action in neonatal resuscitation is the ventilated the baby’s lung (%98.1), needs to be done to prevent heat loss (%98.1) and questions related to the use of oxygen (%98.1) were correctly answered. The question “Ventilation ratio in chest compressions applications to 2 seconds should be 1 compression 3 ventilation” is answered wrongly by %62.9(66). The question “Identifying risk factors during pregnancy and postpartum allows the identification of all infants need to revive” is answered correctly by only %14.3(15) and the question “ While aspiring the baby’s nose and mouth as a rule firstly the mouth then the nose is aspired” is answered correctly by %88.6. Result: Nurse midwives, knowledge and skills of the NRP should be developed with in-service training programs, information should be kept up to date in-service training is repeated periodically after training. Key Words: Knowledge level, midwife, training, nurses, resuscitation.

Time:

Title: Investigation of kangroocarethatapllytoearlynewbornswhoapplıedinvasiveinitiatives in delivery room with comfortneo behaviorscale

Tugba Todil
Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey

Biography

Researcherwhowasborn in Adana-Feke Turkey, 1989; primaryschoolGürümzeElementary School andhighschooleducation at Kozan 50th Year High School (YDA) graduated. ShewonCukurovaUniversitythe Adana Health School NursingDepartment in 2008. 6th semester of education; in 2011 he received her Erasmusexchange program at theUniversity of NicolausCopernicus in Poland. ShegraduatedfromCukurovaUniversity Adana Health School NursingDepartment in 2012. Sheworked as a nurse at General SurgeryIntensiveCareUnit of theCukurovaUniversityHealthPracticeandResearch Center Balcalı HospitalbetweenJanuary 2013 andMarch 2013. Thensheworked as a nurse at theGastroenterologyUnit of Erciyes UniversityHealthPracticeandResearch Center between in March 2013 andAugust 2014. Currentlyshe is a graduatestudent in C.U.HealthSciencesInstituteNursingDepartment.

Abstract

Comfort can be defined as a state that the absence of pain and distress, far from anxiety, a little fun and relaxed (peaceful). Child health and disease nurse should bring the solution to physiological problems of the babies, increase the comfort level of the babies to reduce the stres level and ensure the improvement of the environment which the babies are in. This research is planned experimentally for the purpose of investigation of the effect of the kangroo care with the COMFORTneo Behavior Scale applied in very early newborn kangaroo care to the newborn who born with health in invasive interventions in Adana Maternity and Child Health Hospital maternity units. The research will be made by selecting the babies who has born healthy, full-term and vaginally with random sampling method. Invasive interventions will be applied during the early kangroo care to the infants in the experimental group (n=40) and COMFORTneo Behavior Scale (CBS) will be implemented. Thedatascollected by applying CBS applied without early kangroo care to the infants in the control group (n = 40) in invasive interventions. Invasive procedures performed by a nurse working in the unit and the researchers collecteddatas by observing the transactions. Datas collected with "Baby Information Form", "Family Information Form" and "COMFORTneo Behavior Scale". Any studies about this issue in Turkey wasn’t found in the scanning of international literatüre. It is seen that this research will contribute to the field of child health and diseasenursing based on the need to fill this gap in literatüre. KeyWords: Birth, Invasive Operations, KangarooCare, Comfort, Newborn

Time:

Title: A comprehensive web-based application program (CWAP) to control patients BPSD for the family caregivers of home-dwelling patients with dementi

Heeok Park
Keimyung University, South Korea

Biography

Heeok Park is an assistant professor in Keimyung University College of Nursing, South Korea. She received her PhD degree from the University of Iowa. Her interesting research area is non-pharmacological interventions to control agitation in patients with dementia. Minsuk Gang is an assistant professor in Yeungjincollege of nursing, South Korea. She receivedPh.Dc from Keimyung University, South Korea.Her interesting research area is non-pharmacological interventions to control agitation in patients with dementia. Meera Park was an assistant professor inHosan University of nursing, South Korea. She received her PhD degree from Keimyung University, South Korea.Her interesting research area is education and intervention for women in pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium.

Abstract

Aim:The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive web-based application program(CWAP) for family caregivers of home-dwelling patients with dementia. Method:To develop the CWAP, first, the research related to BPSD in patients with dementia were searched and analyzed through domestic and foreign search engines(Pubmed, Ovid, Riss etc.). In addition, seven family caregivers of patients with dementia who show BPSD were interviewedfor a focus group study. Based on the findings of the research review and the focus group study, the contents of CWAP consisted of the definition and symptoms of dementia, causes of dementia, medications of dementia, non-pharmacological interventions, environmental management, communication skills and cope skills to BPSD depending on the different type of BPSD. The CWAP program is on the process adjusted to the application type with the application company based on the comments of professionals related to the application. Conclusion:The CWAP was developed based on the findings of research review and a focus group. The program was different in terms of that the communication skills and cope skills to BPSD depending on the different type of BPSD. The program needs to be developed to the application form and test the effect of CWAP on BPSD in patients with dementia and family caregivers’ burden.

Time:

Title: Rational medicine usage for mothers with children of age 0-12

Senay Cetinkaya
Cukurova University, Turkey

Biography

Şenay (Ok) Çetinkaya, born in 1967, has completed her bachelor of nursing, master's degree, and PhD in Ege University. In 1988 she was employed as nurse in ICU at the cardiovascular surgery clinic in Ege University, at the medical faculty hospital. In the mean time she has completed her postgraduate (1991) and PhD (1999) on pediatric nursing. Following her move to Malatya due to a spouse-related transfer (1996), she was employed at the Health Colleges of Inönü (1996-2000), Selçuk (2000-2004), and Ege (2004-2007) Universities. Currently she is working at the Faculty of Health Sciences of Çukurova University, Head of the Department of Pediatric Nursing. Besides being instructor and vice-principal at the college, she has coordinated and performed in-service training programs to healthcare personnels, carried out symposium vice-presidency, assistant journal editorship and reviewing, and chair in nursing department. She has international articles (8),international boks chapters (6), translation on a vocational book (thesaurus of skills), national chapters of book (2), has led postgraduate thesis (10), research profects (3), and posted many scientific papers (30) in periodicals.

Abstract

Aim:This study was conducted to determine the medical behavior of mothers with children of age 0-12, rational medicine usage and the causes affecting medicine usage. Method:The study was conducted at University of Cukurova Medical Faculty Balcalı Hospital, Adana, Turkeypediatry policlinics between December 2012 and March 2013 by face to face interviews. Result:30.4% of mothers stated they used medicine prior to admissiont to the hospital. In case of sickness 40.3% of mothers prefer visiting state hospitals first. 32% of mothers do not stop administering antibiotics until suggested dose is completed. 65.4% of them always read the prospectus, 77.3% always check the expiry date and 48.8% always get informed about the dosage of medicine in suspension form. Among mothers who stated that they have knowledge about preparing medicine in suspension form, only 46% correctly described the preparation process. 6.4% of mothers keep the medicine according to the specified temperature and 42.9% dispose the medicine they do not use. While administering the medicine 74.3% of mothers are always mindful of the intervals. There’s a direct correlation found between mothers’ level of education and, knowledge of preparing medicine in suspension form and likelihood of inquiring about the dosage, how they keep the medicine, reading the prospectus and checking the expiry date (p<0.05). Conclucions:Increase the people’s overall level of knowledge about rational medicine usage through videos and by distributing brochures, keeping the knowledge of medical personel up to date and fresh by regular training sessions and having them inform the masses, rewriting the prospectuses more clearly and in a comprehensible manner, and creating legal procedure for disposing unused and expired medicine properly are crucial steps that should be taken. Key Words: Mother, rational medicine usage, child, nursing.

Time:

Title: Domestic violence among female healthcare providers: A meta-analysis

Azmat J Khan
Aga Khan University, Pakistan

Biography

I have done RM,RN,Post-RN, MScN, currently working as an Assistant Professor in Aga Khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery Karachi, for twelve years. Prior to this, I was the Head Nurse in Obs/Gyne of the Aga Khan University Hospital and also worked for ten years in the Emergency Department at the same institute. Altogether I have more than 22 years of working experience in different felids of clinical nursing, nursing education and research. My research interests are emergency nursing, women and child health issues, domestic violence and women empowerment. I have done MScN thesis on Prevalence of Domestic Violence among Married Female Healthcare Providers in Tertiary Care Hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. For which received awardThe Farida Allana Research Award from Rho Delta Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau international.

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of domestic violence among married female healthcare providers within the Pakistani context. Design: A systematic review has been done. Place and duration: From January 1992 to December 2011 the international and national published literature on domestic violence analyzed and scrutinized. Methodology: Used different electronic databases search engines (CINAHL, Medline, Pub Med, PsycInfo, and Global health), Ancestral, hand searching, and citation tracking. The searched result based on 250 published quantitative articles in English language published in scientific journals; finally 54 articles were selected to review. Results: Of the total 54 researched articles revealed that worldwide domestic violence prevalence is ranged of 10% - 69% however, in Pakistan it is 30% to 79%. Verbal violence is the most common type which further leads to other form of domestic violence such as emotional, physical, and sexual violence. Internationally, very limited literatures were available on domestic violence among female healthcare providers but, no literature was found in the Pakistani context. Conclusion: Our literature review reveals that globally female are significantly experiencing in a large proportion with domestic violence and verbal violence in more common. Further research is also need in this regard especially on the ground of domestic violence among healthcare providers. Key words: Domestic Violence, Female, Intimate Partner Violence, Married Female, Healthcare Providers

Sessions:
Psychiatric and mental health nursing
Pallavative care nursing
Perinatal and women health nursing

Time:
10:00 - 10:20

Title: Metacognition versus global cognition and executive function determining mood symptoms post stroke

Claire Donnellan
Trinity College, Ireland

Biography

Dr Claire Donnellan is a Registered Psychologist with the Psychological Society of Ireland, and Assistant Professor and Director of International Initiatives with Trinity College Dublin (TCD), Ireland. She graduated with an honours B.Sc. in Psychology from University of London (2002) and a Ph.D. in Gerontology and Health Psychology from the Department of Clinical Medicine, TCD (2008). Claire’s work experience in healthcare as a researcher and educator expands across the health sciences both here in Ireland and Internationally in Australia, United Kingdom and the Middle East. Her research interests include examining the challenges to successful ageing in both healthy ageing and in age-related illness and disease populations; specifically stroke and neurological patient cohorts. She has published widely in neurology, gerontology, psychology and nursing journals and has served as guest editor and reviewer for a large number of International high impact factor journals. Her memberships include the International Federation of Ageing, Irish Gerontological Society, the World Federation for Neuro-Rehabilitation including the Special Interest Group for Neuropsychology, and both the European and World Stroke Organisation.

Abstract

Introduction: The link between metacognition and mood has been well established, particularly in other conditions with psychological comorbidity, however, there is no evidence regarding this association in the area of stroke. Aims: The aim of the study was to examine correlates of mood symptoms after stroke including global, executive function and metacognition in a Middle Eastern cohort. Methods: One hundred and thirty patients were recruited to a prospective stroke study in Bahrain and n=64 were assessed for mood and cognition. A neuropsychological battery of cognitive assessments included measures: the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), the Trail Making Test (A+B) and the Meta-cognition Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30) for meta-cognition. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale assessed mood symptoms and stroke severity was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Severity Scale (NIH-SS). Results:Total MCQ-30 scores were significantly associated with both anxiety (r = .47, p=.001) and depression (r = .54, p<.0001). The MCQ-30 subscales cognitive confidence, cognitive self-consciousness and uncontrollability/danger were the specific factors to be associated with mood symptoms (p<.01). Global cognition (r=.32, p<.01) but not executive function, was significantly associated with depression only. Metacognition remained a statistically significant correlate with depression (beta = .42, p<.0001) and anxiety (beta = .51, p<.0001) after adjusting for education and global cognition. Discussion:Metacognition is a better determinant of mood symptoms after stroke, especially in regions where illiteracy levels are high in older populations, in comparison to executive function and global cognition. Key words: Stroke, metacognition, global cognition, executive function, depression, anxiety

Time:
10:20 - 10:40

Title: Understanding mental illness through critical theory, postmodernism and the maori philosophical paradigm

Francis Florencio
AUT University, Newzealand

Biography

Francis Florencio. I graduated nursing in 2012 at AUT University in Auckland, New Zealand. I have completed post-graduate certificate in mental health and addictions in University of Auckland as part of the new nursing entry to practice program as supported by the district health board. Currently, I work as a clinical educator in AUT University and bureau nursing in forensic inpatient psychiatric nursing

Abstract

Psychiatric nursing in New Zealand predominantly operates within the medical model. Significant emphasis is placed on diagnosis andpsychopharmacology. Recovery and progress is assessed through treatment of symptoms. Although the medical model and its approaches assist clients to deal with distressing symptoms of mental illness, it does not allow nurses to fully understand the meaning of distressaccording to the clients’ own point of view. Hallucinations and delusions that may have significance to the patient is easily dismissed as psychosis and not necessarily explored with the patient. This can brings about misunderstanding and discord between the nurse and the client, and can sever therapeutic relationship.The client becomes ‘difficult’ and such presentation are viewed as deterioration in mental state. Pharmacological intervention becomes more intensive and the use of seclusion and restraint may be necessitated. Drawing from my experience and practice, I argue theparadigms; critical theory, postmodernism and Maori worldview (the indigenous people of New Zealand)can provide frameworks in which nurses can understand the experiences of mental illness through varying perspectives. These paradigms offer nurses an alternative theoretical perspective alongside the medical model and perhaps bring into light the medical hegemony that operates within psychiatric nursing. I also used an abstract painting to conceptualize these paradigms as inspired by patients who use painting as part of their recovery program and meaningful occupation in the psychiatric unit.

Time:
10:40 - 11:00

Title: Comparing hospice to palliative care: Knowing the difference is important in patient care

Julie Slade
Chatham University, USA

Biography

Dr. Julie Slade has over 17 years’ experience as a nursewith a background in intensive care and hospice nursing. She has spent the last 5 years working in nursing education at Chatham University. Dr. Slade maintains her interest in hospice through her role as membership chairperson for a local chapter of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association. Additionally, Dr. Slade encourages students to gain the most knowledge possible from their hospice experience. Dr. Slade noted confusion amongst providers and patients between hospice and palliative care and is working towards clearing that confusion for the benefit of excellent patient care.

Abstract

There are 7.4 billion people alive on Earth today (Worldometers, 2016). Life expectancy around the world has increased at a dramatic rate over time and there is no evidence that it will lessen in the future (United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 2015). Along with life expectancy, ratios of old to young are increasing (Blair, 2014). An increase of older populations will result in more people living with long-term illnesses and a desire for some level of control over their healthcare choices and end-of-life circumstances. As such healthcare providers are going to be called upon to provide higher levels of hospice and palliative care in the coming years. Hospice and palliative care is available in every state in the United States of America (USA) and in countries throughout the world. Commonly, many healthcare providers are unaware of the differences between hospice and palliative care. Not knowing the differences between the two specialties has many consequences: uninformed providers may not offer the best form of care for patients; providers may utilize incorrect terminology which frightens patients and their families; patient care may suffer and patients may not receive the best care for their situation. In this presentation hospice and palliative care, as offered in the USA, will be defined, compared, and analyzed. Attendees will be offered information about the consequences of not being educated on the differences between hospice and palliative care. This will further be related to patient care and how patient care may suffer due to provider lack of knowledge. Lastly, a personal story of the impact of hospice on the lives of the presenter and her family will be shared.

Time:
11:15 - 11:35

Title: Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscles Exercises Program on Womens Sexual Self-Efficacy after Delivery

Amera Rashed
Menoufyia University, Egypt

Biography

Amera Bekhatroh Awad Allah Rashed has completed her Ph.D at the age of 29 years from Menofyia University. She is a lecturer of maternal & newborn health nursing at Faculty of Nursing Menofyia University from 2014 until now. She is a member of quality assurance, post graduate affairs and environmental affairs committees at Faculty of Nursing Menofyia University.

Abstract

Background: Normal vaginal delivery affects womens body organs, especially the genital organs; such changes may cause problems in the sexual relationship. Aim: This study was conducted with the aim of identifying the effect of pelvic floor muscles exercise program on womens sexual self-efficacy after delivery. Methods: Research Design: A quasi experimental design was used in conducting this study. Participants were randomly assigned to either study or control group. The study group was asked to perform Kegel exercises for 8 weeks. Both groups were evaluated at 4 and 8 weeks. Tools: three tools were used during the course of this study: interviewing questionnaire, Brink scale for measuring pelvic floor muscles strength and Bailes sexual self-efficacy questionnaire. Main results: there was a significant increase in pelvic floor muscle strength in the study group at 4 and 8 weeks after the start of the program without a difference in the control group. There was also a significant increase in sexual self-efficacy in the study group at 4 and 8 weeks after the start of the program. The comparison of the two groups showed a significant difference in sexual self-efficacy after implementing the program. Conclusion: The findings showed that pelvic floor muscles exercises program increases the sexual self-efficacy among women after delivery.

Sessions:
Occupational health nursing
Geriatric nursing
Heart and cardiovascular

Time:
11:35 - 11:55

Title: Moral distress in everyday nursing practice: Roy adaptation theory application

Muder Alkrisat
Chamberlain College of Nursing, USA

Biography

Muder Alkrisat is an Associate Professor of Chamberlain College of Nursing. He completed his doctoral degree in Nursing from Azusa Pacific University. His focus are work place conditions and patient safety, he completed his dissertation on impact of workplace stress in acute settings. He received his Bachelor of Science in nursing and Master in nursing from Jordan University. In 2000, he received two years of training with Natal University in South Africa with research proposals on the “Role of the Facilitator in Case Based and Experiential Learning”. In 2012 he also received extensive training Quality Matter. In 2014-2016 he received extensive training in competency based training to participate actively in curriculum development for BSN-MSN.

Abstract

Background Moral distress is a complex phenomenon of human experience that affects many individuals without a clear definition. Moral distress can be described as painful feelings and/or the psychologic disequilibrium that occurs when nurses are challenged or confronted by situations requiring moral action, but cannot carry out that action because of institutionalized obstacles. These obstacles can include lack of time, supervisory reluctance, an inhibiting medical power structure, institution policy, or legal constraints. Moral distress is a serious problem, it has been associated with job dissatisfaction and loss of nurses from the workplace and the profession. Purpose: To assess the level of moral distress of nurses in acute settings, identify situations that result in high levels of moral distress, explore implications of moral distress, and evaluate associations among moral distress and the characteristics of nurses. Method A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. A total of 199 nurses working in acute care settings anonymously completed the moral distress scale questionnaire and described implications of experiences of moral distress. Results The Moral Distress Scale was completed by the participants. The responses were separated into frequency and intensity answers. Cronbach's α reliability coefficient was usedto assess the reliability of the Moral Distress Scale, which ranged between .89 and .90. Moral distress was significantly correlated with years of nursing experience. Nurses reported that moral distress adversely affected job satisfaction. The most frequently occurring items for moral distress disturbance related to two items: “Work with physicians/nurses who are not as competent as the patient care requires” (M=3.14, SD= 2.91). The least frequent statement was scored for “Ask the patient’s family about donating organs when the patient’s death is inevitable” (M=1.77, SD=1.38). Conclusion Nurses in acute care settings commonly encounter situations that are associated with high levels of moral distress. Experiences of moral distress have negative impact on workplace conditions beyond job satisfaction and retention. Strategies to mitigate moral distress should be developed and tested.

Time:
11:55 - 12:15

Title: Using the GEM method to increase nursing student care of the Geriatric population

Linda Ulak
Seton Hall University, USA

Biography

Graduated in 1975 Magna Cum laude from Seton Hall University, MSN from Wagner College in Adult Nursing and Education, and Ed.D from Seton Hall University in Leadership and Administration in Higher Education. Worked as a staff nurse in GYN and then Surgical ICU for over 20 years. Started teaching at Seton Hall University in 1986 and continues to teach currently. Has also served in the role of Undergraduate Nursing Chair and as associate dean. Currently teaches in the area of Pathophysiology and Gerontological Nursing. Has received awards for teaching from Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International, and the National League for Nursing, New Jersey Chapter

Abstract

There is a new world-wide health care crisis; not a new virus, bacteria or disease. Rather it is the aging of the world’s population. People have survived pan and epidemics, wars and benefited from new medicine and technologies. From 2010 to 2050, the number of individuals over the age of 60 will double and the areas of greatest growth will be in areas of the world considered underdeveloped. It is estimated that by 2020, up to 75% of a nurses time at work will be spent with providing care for the elderly. Who will care for the elderly as the amount of older individuals explodes worldwide? How will these nurses be prepared to provide specialized care to the elderly? Seton Hall University’sMission states that it prepares students to be leaders in their professional and community lives in a global society. At Seton Hall University College of Nursing, Gerontological Nursing is a 2 credit theory course only, placed in first semester junior year. The students are concurrently enrolled in an Adult Health course as their first clinical course. The General Educational Method (GEM) was used in this course to increase the student’s exposure with the elderly. Through the process of experiencing, understanding, judging and deciding, the student is able to incorporate the theory and facts of this course into the real world. There are weekly reflections as well as a LifeStory that is part of the ocurse. Through these methods, the outcome is to educate better prepared new nurses to care for all types of people.. No longer would the elderly be a series of facts or figures but real people with real lives, needs, positives and negative, and most importantly, unique individuals The ultimate outcome being excellent, capable nurses who value the elderly and not cast them aside. By experiencing the elder, the student is deciding and judging for themselves what it means to be an elderly individual.

Time:
12:15 - 12:35

Title: Successful (Healthy) ageing: Is it the solution for nursing in response to population ageing

Claire Donnellan
Trinity College, Ireland

Biography

Dr Claire Donnellan is a Registered Psychologist with the Psychological Society of Ireland, and Assistant Professor and Director of International Initiatives with Trinity College Dublin (TCD), Ireland. She graduated with an honours B.Sc. in Psychology from University of London (2002) and a Ph.D. in Gerontology and Health Psychology from the Department of Clinical Medicine, TCD (2008). Claire’s work experience in healthcare as a researcher and educator expands across the health sciences both here in Ireland and Internationally in Australia, United Kingdom and the Middle East. Her research interests include examining the challenges to successful ageing in both healthy ageing and in age-related illness and disease populations; specifically stroke and neurological patient cohorts. She has published widely in neurology, gerontology, psychology and nursing journals and has served as guest editor and reviewer for a large number of International high impact factor journals. Her memberships include the International Federation of Ageing, Irish Gerontological Society, the World Federation for Neuro-Rehabilitation including the Special Interest Group for Neuropsychology, and both the European and World Stroke Organisation.

Abstract

Population ageing is the process by which older individuals become a proportionally larger share of the total population and this was one of the most distinctive demographic events of the 20th century with fertility decline been the primary determinant.Longevity figures globally not only shows that more people are surviving to old age but once there, they tend to live longer meaning there are expected relative gains in life expectancy. The definitions and indicators used to explain ageing assume that people become old at age 65 although generally, 65-year-olds today live longer than 65-year-olds have in previous centuries. The dramatic rise in life expectancy has resulted in increasing interest in promoting healthier ageing and the study of how people actually age successfully. Although the concept of successful ageing dates back to the 1960s, the goal of successful ageing is now more realistic in today’s ageing society as a result of more effective interventions to control and reduce disability and health risks. It has recently been proposed as a field of interest in gerontological research and as a challenge for the design of social policy. Given the dramatic rise and demographical change of older people living longer within communities, there has never been a greater need for the nursing profession to be at the forefront for this ongoing change challenging health care. This paper will address some of the challenges that nursing faces in healthcare delivery and management. It will also identify how realistic our ageing indicators are, the real challenges associated with ageing and how the promotion of healthy and successful ageing supports the demands of the ageing revolution.

Time:
12:35 - 12:55

Title: Online social support in the saskatchewan heart failure network: the development of the tool

Shauna Davies
University of Regina, USA

Biography

Dr. Shauna Davies is an Instructor with the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Regina and works with undergraduate nursing students in all years of the program. Shauna recently completed her Doctorate of Philosophy in Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan by exploring the use of social networking tools for caregiver education. Shauna has worked as a registered nurse in a variety of clinical settings, such as medicine, surgery and critical care for over 19 years. Her research interests include the use of technology in nursing, social media in patient education and informatics in clinical practice. Shauna is also interested in the use of simulation in nursing education and how this may improve nursing care.

Abstract

The management and prevention of cardiovascular disease is one of the most significant challenges to the health care system, both nationally and internationally. Health 2.0 is a term that denotes the use of web-based tools by health care professionals to communicate with patients, collaborate with other health professionals, and provide health information. The purpose of this interpretive description research study was to explore the factors that have and will continue to influence or contribute to caregivers' use of social networking as a form of social support when a family member is learning to live well with heart failure. The researcher created, designed, and developed a social networking site for caregivers. Following focus group sessions with health care professionals, the Living Well with Heart Failure NING site was reviewed and approved for use. Six caregivers participated on the website and were interviewed before and after participation. The results of this research study provided an insight into the factors that have contributed to the caregivers' search for online sources of health information and peer support. The caregivers’ and health care professionals' perceived consequences of utilizing online resources and social support are also identified. Health care professionals and caregivers found the social networking site easy to use, recommended the use of a moderator, and stressed the need for reliable and trustworthy information.

Sessions:
Nursing care and patient satisfaction

Time:
14:40- 15:00

Title: The frequency of nurse physician collaboration in an acute care hospital

Dawn Marie Nair
St. Vincent's College, USA

Biography

Dr. Dawn Marie Nair is an established author, educator and nurse practitioner. She is an assistant professor at St. Vincent's College, RN to BSN program. She holds a Doctorate degree from Case Western University and a Master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She published her research entitled “The frequency of nurse-physician collaboration in an acute care hospital” in the Journal of Interprofessional Care, March 2012, a peer-reviewed journal. She is a manuscript reviewer for this journal.

Abstract

A new culture bolstering collaborative behavior among nurses and physicians is needed to merge the unique strengths of both nursing and medicine professions into opportunities to improve patient outcomes. To meet this challenge, it is fundamental to comprehend the current uses of collaborative behaviors among nurses and physicians. Evidence for increasing collaboration to decrease communication error is mounting and undeniable. To identify patterns and areas for improvement, a descriptive study was used to delineate frequently used from infrequently used collaborative behaviors of nurses and physicians in order to generate data to support specific interventions for improving collaborative behavior. For the first time in the USA, the Nurse–Physician Collaboration Scale was used to measure the frequency of use of nurse–physician collaborative behaviors self-reported by nurses and physicians. The tool itself is designed to be part of an organizations' ongoing action plan to improve interdisciplinary collaboration, strengthen team building among healthcare professionals and improve culture in Accountable Care Organizations (ACO). Organizations needing to identify and improve areas of communication, medication errors, patient outcomes, etc. are encouraged to implement this tool. In addition to analyzing the frequency of collaborative behaviors, the study compares levels of collaborative behavior reported by nurses and physicians in an USA acute care hospital.

Time:
15:00 - 15:20

Title: Enhancing Clinical Excellence through Appreciative Inquiry: Focus on Improving Patient Outcomes and Patient Satisfactionthrough the Magnet-Re-designation Journey.

Kristen Crusoe
Oregon Health & Sciences University, USA

Biography

Kristen Crusoe EdD, MN, RN is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Oregon Health & Sciences University. Her teaching and research interest lies in complexity science frameworks for leadership and management which brings a holistic rather than reductionist perspective to systems. Dr. Crusoe has practiced in a variety of leadership positions in healthcare and academia. With a clinical background in psychiatric nursing, the experience of working with individuals and groups translates into principles that apply in organizational settings, especially in leading change, managing conflict and building positive group and team interactions.

Abstract

This presentation describes how a large US health system used Appreciative Inquiry to achieve Magnet-Re-designation and through the process, improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. Magnet hospitals have been shown to have higher rates of patient satisfaction. Achieving Magnet Status is a remarkable achievement for a hospital, demonstrating a high degree of staff engagement and dedication to excellence. Maintaining this high degree of engagement over time and achieving Re-designation can be a challenge. Appreciative inquiry is a strengths-based approach emanating from a positive core. From this positive core, teams discover, dream, design and created their preferred destiny. A SOAR (Strengths, Opportunities, Aspirations, and Results) was conducted with members of the Magnet Champions from throughout the organization. The overarching theme that arose from this SOAR was the need for greater embracement of professional practice. The three opportunities that emerged from this theme were a structure for professional practice that promotes evolution of a culture of clinical excellence; recruitment of clinical excellence champions at every nursing level to grow broader engagement; and integration of professional practice with their system of Lean.The team then engaged in an Appreciative Inquiry around these opportunities.The topic chosen for AI was “Living our Magnet Vision through Integration of Professional Practice with Lean.” The shared vision was that through integration of the professional practice model with the power of Lean methodology, the team would set priorities, take ownership and focus their energy and passion on work that brings value to the patient.

Time:
15:20 - 15:40

Title: Nail trimming: A qualitative content analysis of practices narrated by a cohort with diabetes

Maen ZaidAbu-Qamar
Edith Cowan University, Australia

Biography

Maen is a registered nurse holding a Doctor of Nursing degree from Adelaide University-Australia in 2007. Maens research interest is chronic conditions mainly the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. After graduation, Maen has joined the faculty of nursing of Mu'tah University, Jordan, where Ma'en has continued his research mainly qualitative in the field of diabetic foot care. Ma en has several publications in peer reviewed journals for which Ma en has been promoted as an associate professor, Faculty of Nursing, Mu'tah University. Ma en acted as an external examiner for several master thesis, Adelaide University. Ma’en also supervised (co-supervisor) a PhD student and a master student. In 2013, Ma en joined the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University, Australia. In 2014, Ma'en moved to the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Australia in the capacity of lecturer in nursing. Ma en is currently involved in systematic reviews concerning family experiences with chronic conditions plus environmental causes of foot injuries among people with diabetes.

Abstract

Foot ulceration is the most frequent complication of diabetes, and it is deemed that a substantial proportion of these ulcers can be avoided with proper self-care. The care is multifaceted ranging from maintaining optimum blood glucose levels to a wide range of foot care practices. Proper nail trimming is an example of those foot care practices. The purpose of this research was to portray nail trimming practices among Jordanians with diabetes. To do so, qualitative content analysis is currently being employed to analysis responses to an open-ended question concerning the way of nail trimming. SPSS will also be employed to configure respondents’ demographic profile. The open-ended question was asked during an interview guided by a questionnaire seeking information from people with diabetes concerning their knowledge and practices.The interviews were conducted after obtaining the required ethics approvals from departments governing the study settings that were nine healthcare facilities in the south of Jordan plus the Capital, Amman. Initial finding of the qualitative content analysis donated four main themes including the direction/ the shape that encompass responses described the way of trimming. The second theme included responses concerning the tool used in trimming. Responses concerned the trimming extend were aggregated under one theme. The fourth theme enclosed the persons from who the participants seek help in nail trimming. These findings will be discussed within the context of available literature concerning nail trimming. Such a discussion will enable developing evidence-based recommendations in which patients’ views will be enclosed. As a result, incidence of foot-ulcers will reduced among the population with diabetes.

Time:
15:55 - 16:15

Title: Does quality of sleep change during two years in patients with peritoneal dialysis

Pia Yngman-Uhlin
Linkoping University, Sweden

Biography

Registered Nurse, MScN Pia Yngman-Uhlin is a PhD and research supervisor in Region of Östergötland and at Linköping University in Sweden. She is working in the field of Renal Care and chronic diseases in southeast of Sweden. Her research is about sleep problems, fatigue and health related quality of life. Other areas of research are, young adults health seeking behavior and implementation of Nurse Practitioners in Swedish health care.

Abstract

Background:Chronic kidney disease is a global health burden and affects about 13% of European adults. Aprevalence of insomnia over 80% in all dialysis modalities has been reported. Impaired sleep has consequences on the daytime functioning which is serious in patients with advanced self-care responsibility. Few prospective studies, following sleep quality in dialysis population have been found. It is however, clear that patients in peritoneal dialysis(PD) have generally decreased QoL compared to the general population. Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the sleep qualityduring a period of two years in patients, undergoing PD treatment at the baseline assessments. Method: This study has a prospective design with a 2-year follow-up. At baseline 55 patients with PD were included. After two years 26 were available for follow-up (Md (61) Q1-Q3 (48-69) years), 14 were treated in PD, three in hemodialysis (HD) and nine were transplanted (TX).Sleep quality were assessed by Uppsala Sleep Inventory (USI) and sleep sufficiency index (SSI) i.e. nocturnal sleeping time/expected sleeping time*100 were calculated as an index where a value above 80 were considered to be insufficient sleep. Results: Sleep quality was improved in the follow up group after two years, but not statistically significant, (p= 0.07).Sleep duration and sleep onset was improved in the follow-up group, but not significantly. Allthough, SSI indicated insufficient sleep both at baseline and after two years, (p=0.3). Difficulty to find a comfortable sleep position and leg jerks significantly predicted 71% of sleep quality outcome in the follow up group after two years, (p<0.001). Pruritus was a lesssleep disturbing factor for the patients who had been transplanted compared to patients in PD/HD after two years (p=0.025). Conclusion: This study indicates that sleep problems remains over time andthat transplanted patients have less disturbed sleep than patients in dialysis treatment. With such high frequency of sleep problems in dialysis patients healthcare providers must regularly assess sleep quality and sleep disturbing factors and identify a focus for the sleep intervention to reduce the symptom burden.

Time:
16:15 - 16:35

Title: Nursing and patient satisfaction

Ana Peliteiro Neto
Emirates Home Nursing, UAE

Biography

‘Ana Neto is a Portuguese trained nurse with over five years’ experience between the UK and the Middle East. Qualified from Nursing School of Coimbra in Portugal, Ana went on to acquire her specialization in Neonatal Nursing in Kings College London and postgraduation course in Mentorship in Professional Practice in BUCKS New University, UK. Nominated and awarded CARES title from Imperial Healthcare NHS Trust, Ana’s passion for her work has shown throughout her career. Currently the Assistant Clinical Manager at Emirates Home Nursing, Ana continues to share this knowledge and enthusiasm through her training and educational workshops for nurses in the UAE.’

Abstract

The quality of care was traditionally judged by parameters, such as complication rates and mortality, from 1990 providers have begun to understand that patients’ perceptions of their care are also important to them. This led to an increasing interest in patients’ perspective of health care delivery as part of the mission to find how health systems can better respond to individual needs and preferences, called continuous quality improvement. Thus, patient experience started to be recognized as one of the three pillars of quality in healthcare alongside clinical effectiveness and patient safety, as well as a quality improvement tool for overall organizational performance. Nursing profession is directly related with patient satisfaction as nurses are the closest healthcare providers to patients. In fact, nurses’ courtesy, respect and careful listening are highly ranked aspects of nursing care on patients’ satisfaction in comparison to other factors such as physician care, admission process, physical environment and cleanliness. Patient satisfaction includes elements of subjectivity, expectations and perceptions and it consists on individuals’ cognitive evaluation of, an emotional reaction to, their healthcare experience. As a result, the research studies investigated, for this presentation, about the relationship between patient satisfaction and nursing care shown contradictory aspects in their findings.It has been argued that care cannot be of high quality if the patient is notsatisfied. By addressing patient satisfaction, practices and institutions can increase market share, patient retention, referrals and revenue.

Time:
16:35 - 16:55

Title: Patient Involvement for Safer Care -Nurses Perceptions.

Kristina Schildmeijer
Linnaeus University, Sweden

Biography

Kristina Schildmeijer, RN, PhD and senior lecturer at the Institution of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University in Kalmar, Sweden. Kristina Schildmeijer has many years of experience working both as a Registered Nurse and as Head of Division. She defended her dissertation in 2013 and the name of the thesis was Retrospective record Review- A Matter of Patient Safety. She is a part of several research teams and is also participating in a national collaboration by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regionsfor the development of a manual for the identification of Adverse Events in Swedish home care settings. At the Linnaeus University Kristina Schildmeijer is working asa senior lecturer and is teaching subjects as Patient Safety, Caring Leadership, Lifestyle- and Health subjects and System Theory.

Abstract

Aim: To explore nurses perceptions and experiences with regard to patient involvement of relevance for patient safety. Method: The study was set in Sweden from May 2015 to February 2016. Individual interviews with 19 nurses, (11 registered nurses and 8 nurse assistants) were performed. They were employed in five different work units: (1) pulmonary medical unit in a university hospital (600 beds); (2) surgery unit in mid-sized hospital (350 beds); (3) ear nose and throat unit in a mid-sized hospital (500 beds); (4) one maternity care unit and (5) one nursing home. Data were analysed using content analysis according to Hsieh and Shannon. Results: Four categories related to patient involvement emerged: Health care providers ways of influencing patient participation for safer care; patients ways of influencing patient participation for safer care; Barriers to patient participation for safer care; and Impact of patient participation. The nurses described that they can facilitate patient participation by providing conditions to this participation, including taking the time to listen to the patients and inviting them to ask questions and be active in the dialogue. Patients need to receive and understand given information. Continuity of health care staff isa factor that influences the opportunity to establish a trusting relationship.Patients who are active and question aspects of their treatment or care, such as long waiting times or old medical aids, could gain advantages compared to patients who not raise any complaints or concerns. Patients who perceive that the providers are stressed are unwilling to ask questions or start a dialogue, they dont want to disturb or interrupt more important tasks.Lack of privacy is a problem at clinical wards where patients often share rooms with other patients. Conclusions: Patient involvement does not happen by itself. Both patients and care givers must take responsibility if patient participation for safer care is going to be realized.

Time:
16:55 - 17:15

Title: Nursing care after cochlear implant surgery

Mina Moradi
Islamic Azad University, Iran

Biography

I have completed my bachelors from Zanjan University of medical sciences with title of top student and I completed my master of Science in medical surgical nursing in Tehran University of medical sciences, I am PhD student in University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. I worked as faculty member at Zanjan University of medical sciences about 3 years 2011-2013, and now I works as faculty member of Department of Nursing, Tehran Medical sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University,Tehran ,Iran.

Abstract

Introduction: Cochlear implant as a surgeon for the treatment of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss is considered, And have major and minor complications, and not only children but also their parents are involved, Role of nurses in maintaining of community health, is a privileged role. nurses not only in hospitals but with other members of rehabilitation teams with an emphasis on the principle of cooperation ,A continuum of rehabilitation care and support for children and adults patients provide ,for improve the capabilities, achieve independence, reintegration individual to society, in general improve the quality of life people of the community. In this study, nursing care after Cochlear implant surgery be reviewed. Methods: In this study, we review related literature, with English key words: nursing care , cochlearimplant nursing ,in data bases of pub med, web of science, scopus and googlescholar Finally, about 14 related articles was evaluated and results were extracted. Results: Nursing care includes nursing care immediately after surgery and in the hospital, routine postoperative care and special education after the operation, including: education about drugs , Activity , Nutrition , Limitation of post-operative , Attention to the vaccination, dangerous warning signs, major and minor symptoms in children as well as the symptoms of otitis media, meningitis in them and investigation health-related issues . Conclusion: The nurses can play a key role in improving the treatment of children after cochlear implant surgery. But, the role of nurses in the team of rehabilitation of cochlear implant patients is not clear.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
11:15 - 11:45

Title: The Future of Nursing Education

Nezam Al-Nsair
University of Mount Union, USA

Biography

Dr. Al-Nsair is a tenured professor and the founding Chair and Director of the Nursing program at the University of Mount Union. Dr. Al-Nsair was instrumental in the development of new graduate master and doctoral programs in various universities and in obtaining accreditation. He taught in traditional undergraduate and graduate programs, RN-BSN, and online programs. He served as peer reviewer for the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) that grants accreditation for Universities for institutions. He is experienced leader who served in various leadership positions and experienced practitioner who worked as a nurse in med-surge and critical care units.

Abstract

Abstract Nursing education continues to evolve across the world to meet the demands of ever changing health care systems and consumer health needs. Nursing schools across the globe find themselves adapting their curriculum and the way they educate future nurses to face the new challenges and demands in a world of increasing technology and complexity of health care systems. Nursing schools have the obligation to educate nurses that are competent and provide safe and quality care. Many nursing schools responded to the new challenges of health care with creative ways to improving curriculum design and ways to implement it. In this presentation, the author will provide a review of the development of nursing education over the last 20 years and then focus on factors and demands that shaped the current nursing education development. The presenter will discuss what the future of nursing education trends are and the necessary elements nursing schools have to consider to optimize their effectiveness in graduating nurses who will be ready to meet future challenges with competence and flexibility. Healthcare agencies and consumers of health are demanding healthcare professionals and nurses to be able to collaborate and communicate in ways they never had to in the past. Nursing schools need to create a learning environment that allows for meaningful collaboration, use of technology, simulation, and wellness care. The presenter will discuss major elements to consider for successful visionary nursing education programs and give examples of the future of advance practice nurses role.

Sessions:
Nursing education

Time:
11:45 - 12:05

Title: Nurses readiness to use Telehealth in the West of Scotland

Audrey Cund
University of the West of Scotland, UK

Biography

Audrey Cund is a Mental Health Nurse Lecturer and PhD student at the University of the West of Scotland. Audrey has extensive experience in higher education and over 20years in clinical practice. She has a keen interest in research and has published in the area of alcohol education, holistic care, innovation in higher education and self-management. Her current interests lie in self-management, Telehealth and the role technology plays in caring for individuals.

Abstract

Background Technology plays an increasing role in supporting, innovating and shaping the lives of people around the world. Technological advancements involving mobile technologies are transforming how people interact and communicate with each other (Scottish Government 2011, 2013). Multiple studies have examined the issue of acceptance and technology adoption in health services around the world. Nurses have been slow to accept, adopt and lead on the use of Telehealth in their job roles. Several authors acknowledge this is a neglected area of research for nurses and the impact this has on their professional identity and competencies. Design This quantitative study utilised an online survey design to obtain a convenience sample of pre and post qualified nurses (N=800) to determine their readiness and acceptance to use telehealth. The Unified Theory of Use and Acceptance of Technology (UTUAT) was modified with permission to reflect its application to telehealth and nursing. Ethical approval was granted by UWS ethics committee. Results 244 pre and post registration nurses undertook the survey accounting for a 30% response rate. 52% were pre-registration and 48% post-registration. Participants were drawn from all areas of clinical practice with a wide range of clinical experience. Participants knowledge of telehealth is good however 77% identify they do not use telehealth in their job role. Nearly all participants (95%) identify that they need to develop their skills in IT, use of equipment such as smart phones and video conferencing facilities. Conclusions This study provides a baseline description of the knowledge, skills and acceptance to use technology by nurses in the West of Scotland. The results add to the growing body of evidence around telehealth acceptance and the role of nurses. Further research is planned to understand the nurses experience of use pre and post an educational intervention.

Time:
12:05 - 12:25

Title: Student experience of transition from FE to HEI

Louise Johnston
University of the West of Scotland, UK

Biography

Louise Johnston is a lecturer in Adult Health at the University of the West of Scotland. After 20 years of clinical practice Louise moved into Higher Education in 2008 and successfully completed an MSc in Healthcare Education in 2011 which focused on student transition. Louise is the module coordinator of the bespoke summer module which facilitates the transition of HNC students directly into second year. Louise is a part time PhD student at Edinburgh University where she is researching Adult and Mental Health student nurses articulation journey from Further Education to Higher Education, Graduation and Employment via an Extended Practice Learning Experience (EPLE) transitional module.

Abstract

Articulation from Further Education (FE) to Higher Education (HE) has been a key area of work for the University of the West of Scotland (UWS), School of Health Nursing and Midwifery. This is viewed as a mechanism to acknowledge students prior learning and facilitate entry into year two of an undergraduate pre-registration nursing programme. Harvey etal (2006) recognises that as a result of widening participation the student population is more diverse, calling for an increased need to support this heterogeneous student group. Gallacher (2006) also advocates that close partnership working between FE and HE institutions is required to adequately prepare students to articulate into 2nd year. Bradbury-Jones et al (2010) concur and further add that empowerment supports the academic and clinical transition and mentors and peers play a key role in their socialisation. Close collaboration with NHS providers and FE Colleges has been central to the development of this programme and the evaluation of the student experience. Method This qualitative study captures the students transition from FE to 2nd year following completion of a bespoke module. Focus groups and questionnaires were utilised to describe and understand the students experience. Ethical approval was granted by UWS University Ethics Committee. Findings Knowledge, preparation and confidence emerged as key themes that support the students transition and articulation to 2nd year. Peer and Mentor support are pivotal to the students experience and sense of identity as they transition. The findings add to the growing body of evidence around student experience of articulation and provide a deeper insight into the students experiences of academic, clinical and social transition. Conclusions The student experience is positive and the evaluation highlights that to sustain this articulation route partnership working, preparation; and peer and mentor support are factors that require further development and evaluation.

Time:
12:25 - 12:45

Title: Phenomenological Findings of Nursing Student Experiences in Service-learning

Sherry Arvidson
University of Regina, Canada

Biography

I am currently employed with the Faculty of Nursing at University of Regina. I recently completed a Doctor of Education program specializing in curriculum and instruction through the University of Phoenix in collaboration with University of Regina. I focused on nursing student perceptions and experiences of service-learning in nursing education using heuristic phenomenology. The four year journey of doctoral studies led to the completion of a doctoral degree in May 2015. My scholarship activities include: chapter book contributions, presentations at national conferences, peer review work including journal articles and textbooks, and manuscript writing for publication. Current research projects include the use of Smart Infusion pumps in the Clinical Setting and Bullying Among Nursing Students During Clinical Practicums. During the Spring 2016, I was the recipient of the University of Regina Presidents Award for Teaching Excellence.

Abstract

The lack of critical thinking among beginning practitioners has resulted in the need to ensure students have learning opportunities that promote the transformation of learning. The areas of cultural competency and self-efficacy among learners are two components essential for students to develop in the nursing profession. Nurse Educators need to recognize strategies that will foster the development of critical thinking and allow students to demonstrate an understanding of safe cultural practice. Service-learning is one method of instructional pedagogy used to promote student success through the construction of knowledge and application of theory in practice education. Providing students with learning opportunities that enhance knowledge and practical application is important in nursing education. An early understanding of cultural diversity assists learners to demonstrate growth in confidence and become culturally competent in their nursing career. A heuristic phenomenological methodology was used to explore first year student perceptions and experiences of service-learning in nursing education. The phenomenological approach included student perceptions and experiences. The heuristic component added a personal influence for the researcher to recognize the importance of curriculum alignment, agency selection, and tasks to enhance knowledge. The evolution of four themes contributing to the improvement of academia and community enhancement became evident through a heuristic approach of data analysis. Data saturation from 13 participants revealed the thematic development of experiential naivety, systems misalignment, personal exhilaration, and transformation of learning. The identification of effective instructional strategies to support learning became crucial for students and beneficial for community stakeholders. Strategies leading to the development of critical thinking and cultural competence was identified as a necessity in the early stages of classroom instruction. Problem-based learning, round table discussions, and reflective writing were identified as examples of how students learn to construct knowledge in the classroom and share wisdom in the community. Conclusions that transpired from the study include: the importance of pre-entry assessment of prior education and knowledge, providing learning environments that foster the transformation of learning, continuous evaluation of student learning and agency opportunities, and the importance of student support to gain an understanding of the benefits of service-learning in the community.

Time:
12:45 - 13:05

Title: Active Learning Strategies in Nursing Education Moving Away from the Traditional Lecture

Laureen Turner
University of San Francisco, USA

Biography

Laureen Turner is a dedicated professional with a passion for interactive, evidence-based teaching pedagogy to enhance student learning. In the classroom, Laureen utilizes several interactive opportunities to enhance student learning. In the clinical setting, Laureen works toward finding unique learning opportunities to augment classroom instruction and promote critical thinking. Areas of clinical expertise include: pediatrics, maternal child, home care, hospice care, nursery, and informatics. Teaching expertise includes professional nursing, pediatrics, maternal child, evidence-based practice and nursing informatics. Additionally, Laureen lectures on topics of active learning strategies, critical thinking in clinical education, preparation for clinical education, self-efficacy, and faculty mentorship.

Abstract

This presentation will consist of informing participants on best practices in active learning to be used in the typical lecture classroom. Content will focus on the use of strategies that include, audience response systems, case studies, gaming, classroom assessment techniques (CATS), and collaborative learning. A focus will be on the effective use of technology in the classroom to include smart phones, tablets, and computers.

Time:
13:40 - 14:00

Title: Ensuring quality instructional design for on-line successful advanced assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills beyond the virtual lab

Michael Jacqueline Lall
University of Texas at Arlington, USA

Biography

Jackie L. Michael, RN, PhD, APRN, WHNP-BC hasbeen a Registered Nurse for 28 years and a Womens Health Nurse Practitioner for 22 years. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing and Health Innovation and a Womans Health Nurse Practitioner II for Parkland Health and Hospital System. She designs online courses. She has practiced as a Nurse Colposcopist and serves as a Legal Nurse Consultant and expert witness. She has many presentations, papers, and posters to her credit. Dr. Michael leadership includes Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing DT-102 President, National Association of Indian Nurses of America Executive VP, Indian American Nurses Association of North Texas Past President and Advisory Committee Chair, Texas Nurses Association District 4 Board of Directors, TNA D4 Mock Trial Committee, and Elsevier Foundations Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy Program mentor.

Abstract

This presentation will discuss innovative instructional considerations from content design to teaching strategies and evaluation methods as faculty meet the challenges of rapidly converting in-seat content for on-line delivery while they try to meet their own learning needs along with those of the on-line learners. This presentation is designed for beginner, intermediate and experienced instructors and faculty who are teaching in clinical and academic settings, and are faced with the challenges of the flipped Classroom. While they are committed to quality instruction in a rapidly evolving environment and learners with diverse learning needs beyond those of age and learning styles. Presentation will discuss principles of instructional design in detail and will include defining Essential Content including considerations from meeting credentialing requirements to the needs defined by clinical employers who hire our students. Evaluation methods to include quality matrix and measurement tools to measure effectiveness will be discussed. Innovative teaching strategies including technology requirements and clear expectations to meet course outcomes by providing timelines and schedules examples will be compared. Considerations and method for creating rubrics for students and faculty with clear expectations and tips will be shared regarding the dos and donts of rubric design. Strategies for Re-Chunking the content into doable bite size readings, learning activities and submissions for grading examples of these be shared with the audience during the presentation. Inter Rater Reliability exercise and methods used by the presenter will be evaluated. Process, principles, benefits and limitations and challenges used to for effective and efficient outcomes will be compared. Diagnostic Reasoning Skills and Scenarios used by the author will be discussed and examples will be shared with the audience during the presentation for problem focused exams conducted by graduate students. OSCE and use of Standardized Patients (SP) for objective rubric-based evaluation will be shared along with rubrics and OSCE Lab set-up examples for the audience. Our goal is to encourage the heart and bring the joy of teaching back in the on-line and in-seat class room as the author believes Mistake is the price paid for a valuable lesson learned and not a failure, It s OK to laugh at yourself it keeps the heart young, Remembering why we wanted to teach and revisiting our teaching philosophies from time to time is a good thing.

Time:
14:00 - 14:20

Title: Live Practice Experiences in Online Nursing Education

Julie Slade
Chatham University, USA

Biography

Dr. Julie Slade has over 17 years experience as a nurse with a background in intensive care and hospice nursing. She has spent the last 5 years working in nursing education at Chatham University. In her first role at the university Dr. Slade was the Clinical Coordinator for the nursing department. She was responsible for streamlining the practice experience for students in all three degree programs while also ensuring all legal matters were attended to. After three years in that role Dr. Slade moved into the role of Assistant Professor of Nursing and the RN-BSN Program Coordinator. In this role Dr. Slade focuses on all aspects of RN-BSN education while continuing to ensure a quality live practice experience for every student.

Abstract

Online nursing education attracts geographically diverse students seekinghigher levels of education. Nurses can gain knowledge in the online classroom however learning becomes real whenlivepractice experiences are incorporated into the learning environment. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) recommends practice experiences in their Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (2008), Essentials of Masters Education in Nursing (2011), and Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice (2006). When working with geographically diverse students executing effective live practice experiences can be challenging.Faculty may not be in the same location as the student and therefore quality may not be assured. A nursing program at a small private mid-Atlantic university in the United States that provides RN-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctor of Nursing Practice education has incorporatedlive geographically convenient practice experience opportunities into their online education. Students in each program are required to complete online classroom education where content, concepts, and theories are discussed aiding in the students ability to master multiple levels of thinking as outlined in Blooms Taxonomy. Live practice experiences are utilized as a conduit for making the education real and helping students have a better grasp on what they are learning in the online classroom. During this presentation the live practice experiencesincorporated into the three nursing degree programs will be shared, student expectations will be emphasized, goals of the live practice experiences will be discussed, and legal considerations will be highlighted. Stories of positive outcomes from live practice experiences will encourage attendees to incorporate similar practices into their online nursing programs. Additionally, attendees will learn how creating live practice experiences in online education is possible and develop strategies for creating similar requirements for their online nursing programs.

Time:
14:20 - 14:40

Title: Attrition matters: Whats missing in the debate

Hazel Kyle
University of the West of Scotland, UK

Biography

Hazel Kyle is a Mental Health nurse lecturer and a Practice Education Facilitator working in a joint appointment with the University of the West of Scotland and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, the largest Health Board in Scotland. I have been a nurse for 34 years and the last 13 years in a practice education role. I have an interest in practice education primarily around how we assess and retain students on pre-registration nursing programmes and look to share experiences and models of practice education from a nursing and education practice perspective with colleagues across the globe.

Abstract

Understanding the factors and characteristics of attrition is a national priority enhancement theme and a contemporary issue in higher education. Age, widening access, and entry qualifications are identified as some of the factors that influence attrition in higher education. Education in nursing has been radically overhauled in the last two decades in response to a number of unprecedented political, technological and societal challenges (Fry et al., 2009). To achieve recognition and a credible position in society nursing has evolved from a hospital-practice-based culture to a profession governed by professional standards and ethics with a strong public image (NMC, 2010; Watson and Thompson, 2000). Attrition of students in higher education programmes is a national enhancement theme in the UK and worldwide. The experience of year one students is noted to be a critical period. The student’s experience of transition to higher education (HE) involves adapting socially, culturally and personally. However, despite the depth and breadth of the literature on this theme, narrowing down individual or collective characteristics that contribute to attrition remain elusive. This study explores if entry-level qualifications and age are linked to academic and clinical practice performance and progression, as students transition from year 1 to year 2 of a nursing programme. This is a quantitative retrospective cohort study using pre-existing participant data from a cohort of Adult and Mental Health Nurses (n=604) at one Scottish university. Ethical approval was granted by the Dean of the School of Health, Nursing and Midwifery and the School of Education Ethics Committee. This study adds to the growing body of evidence around the factors that influence student attrition at the end of year one. Attrition in this cohort was found to be 1% with another 14% of students carrying academic credit deficit into year 2. Age and entry qualifications were found to influence theory results; however, no significance was found in relation to clinical practice results.

Time:
14:40 - 15:00

Title: Combining and integrating life /social sciences and citizen trainers in Nurse Education - a N. Ireland initiative

Johanna McMullan
Queens University, uk

Biography

Dr John Power and Johanna McMullan are both lecturers in the School of Nursing and Midwifery Queens University Belfast. Johanna McMullan is currently a Ph.D. student. They jointly coordinate the life, social science and public health module Health and Well-Being delivered to undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. They both emanate from significant clinical backgrounds with many years in clinical practice as front-line clinicians, ward or unit managers or service managers, before returning to education. They both have an increasing range of joint publications significantly reflecting from their teaching and learning experience.

Abstract

Before commencement of the academic year 2012/2013 the social sciences, public health and the biomedical sciences were taught to separate modules reinforcing the perception off separate disciplines As a result of significant discussion and interdisciplinary negotiation the life, social sciences public health/ health education were drawn together in the one module for the academic year 2012/13. The module provides the undergraduate students with an introduction to an understanding of Life Sciences, psychology, sociology and public health and their contribution within the context of nursing and midwifery. The intention is to provide the student with a more integrated understanding and teaching focussed on health promotion rather than disease management. One of the particular areas of interest and sensitivity is engaging the students to the context of the Northern Ireland civil unrest (the Troubles); this involves a co-educational initiative with service users. The tutorials are substantially led by those who had been involved with and experienced loss and trauma as a result of the conflict as citizen trainers, in improving students understanding of the impact of The Troubles on patients and clients affected by the events and to help better provide a quality of care. This approach is relatively unique and clearly reflects the Schools policy of progressively engaging with users and carers of nursing and midwifery services as co-educators to students. Only now could perhaps such a sensitive level of training to student nurses and midwives be delivered across communities with potential educative lessons for other communities experiencing significant civil unrest and sectarian conflict.

Time:
15:15 - 15:35

Title: Using tangible objects to enhance deep learning in clinical courses

Maryann Godshall
Drexel University, USA

Biography

Maryann Godshall, PhD, RN, CCRN, CPN, CNE is an Assistant Clinical Professor at Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions in Philadelphia, PA where she teaches critical care and pharmacology. She obtained her BSN from Allentown College of St. Francis DeSales and her MSN from DeSales University. She has a post-master’s degree in Nursing Education from Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA. Maryann completed her PhD at Duquesne University (2014) and her research topic was “Exploring Learning of Pediatric Burn Patients through Storytelling.” Maryann has worked in Pediatrics and continues working in Pediatric Critical Care and Pediatric In-patient Rehabilitation nursing. She has been a nurse for over 25 years. She holds certification in both Pediatrics and Pediatric Critical Care and has been teaching for over 20 years in both the university and hospital settings. Maryann is co-editor of The Certified Nurse Examination (CNE) Review Manual (2016), and wrote Fast Facts of Evidence Based Practice, 2nd Ed (2016); Springer Publishing Company.” She has published chapters in several books & textbooks. Caring for the Child with a Chronic Condition and the Dying Child & Caring for the Child with Cancer in Maternal-Child Nursing Caring: Optimizing Outcomes for Mothers, Children & Families, 2nd Ed. (2016). F.A. Davis. Disaster Nursing: A Handbook for Practice (2009), Jones & Bartlett as well as many journal articles.

Abstract

Many academic nurse educators recognize the pressure of ‘‘covering’’ an incredible amount of content during the allocated classroom time.Then how are we assured the content we are covering is retained by the student. Deep learning is both a learning approach and a learning strategy that promotes conceptual learning. It is a term first described by Marton and Saljo (1976). Deep learning occurs when new information is linked to old information which is argued that by linking new information to old information, that information is retained longer. A discussion will be presented of the three types of learning styles (deep, surface, and strategic learning). Latest research will be presented discussing these three learning styles. Insight as to why deep learning strategies has been successful in students understanding and learning complex disease processes and principles will be shared. By utilizing tangible objects in the classroom it is a more active learning strategy and has been found not only engages the students but does facilitate deep learning of complex concepts in advanced medical surgical nursing, critical care, and pediatric nursing courses. Examples of using tangible objects to promoted deep learning will be presented.

Time:
15:35 - 15:55

Title: Nurses knowledge of blood glucose levels and the management of hypo and hyper glycaemia: a descriptive study

Nasreena Waheed
Charles Darwin University, Australia

Biography

Nasreena was born in the Maldives and started her nursing career more than 20 years ago with a diploma of nursing from Baqai University, Pakistan. Since then she has obtained a Bachelors, Masters and Doctorate from three Australian universities and is currently a practicing registered nurse in Australia as well as a full time lecturer. Her clinical experience is mainly on medical nursing and she has been the head of an acute medical unit before transferring to academia. Her research interests range from Primary Health Care to Oncology Nursing and Nursing Education. She supervises postgraduate students from Charles Darwin University as well as Villa College in the Maldives.

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic, systemic disease in which the body produces very little or no insulin, or is unable to use insulin resulting in high levels of glucose in the blood(1).In Australia, diabetes has been among the leading causes of mortality, morbidity and disability, and was the 6th leading cause of death in 2014(2). Research has shown that patient education is vital for diabetes control and management. However, research has shown that nurses (who are at the forefront of care) knowledge of diabetes is variable and not sufficient in the researched populations(3-5). The study aimed to identify the current state of knowledge of diabetes among nursing staff in South Australia using a cross sectional design involving a check list to guide structured observation of blood glucose monitoring procedures followed by a structured questionnaire to gather information on the knowledge level of nurses in relation to blood glucose levels.The study was conducted in one service unit of a public, teaching hospital in South Australia. A convenience sample of nurses who were directly involved in the provision of care for diabetic patients were recruited for the study. Approval for the study was gained from the hospitals Research Ethics Committee. The observation checklist and the survey questionnaire were scored by hand and entered into SPSS and reviewed for data entry accuracy.Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Non-parametric statistics were used to compare the knowledge scores between the mentioned groups since the data were not normally distributed. Pearson product-moment coefficient was used to describe the strength and direction of correlation betweenselected variables.Twenty nurses completed the questionnaire and 32 nurses were observed during their practice.The results of this study showed that the demographic data were not correlated with higher knowledge scores or higher observation scores. Therefore, the demographic characteristics investigated in this study were not significantly associated with knowledge or practice. The average score obtained from this study was comparatively higher than that of other studies which explored nurses knowledge of diabetes. This may be because participation in the study was voluntary and this self-selection for participation may have positively skewed the results. The areas of knowledge were found to be highly variable with no clear pattern to correct or incorrect responses across the techniques and safe parameters for blood glucose management. It is recommended that this study be replicated in other units of the hospital to see whether the same results could be achieved.

Time:
15:55 - 16:15

Title: Using Storytelling as a Qualitative Research Methodology & Using Tangible objects to Enhance Deep Learning in Clinical Courses

Maryann Godshall
Drexel University, USA

Biography

Maryann Godshall, PhD, RN, CCRN, CPN, CNE is an Assistant Clinical Professor at Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions in Philadelphia, PA. Maryann completed her PhD at Duquesne University (2014) and her research topic was “Exploring Learning of Pediatric Burn Patients through Storytelling.” Maryann has worked in Pediatrics and continues working in Pediatric Critical Care and Pediatric In-patient Rehabilitation nursing. She holds certification in both Pediatrics and Pediatric Critical Care. Maryann is co-editor of The Certified Nurse Examination (CNE) Review Manual (2016), and wrote Fast Facts of Evidence Based Practice, 2nd Ed (2016); Springer Publishing Company. She has published chapters in several books & textbooks as well as many journal articles. Maryann has presented both nationally and internationally most recently in Philadelphia and at the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses (WFCCN) in Brisbane, Australia, April 2016

Abstract

In researching the method of storytelling a comprehensive literature search was conducted using the words “storytelling” or “narratives.” Stories are fundamental dimensions of human experience and nursing practice (Smith & Liehr, 2005). Storytelling also affects the four domains of human existence. In the cognitive domain, the story transmits knowledge and assists in problem solving. Affectively stories bring about hope and may be cathartic; the creation of being connected and in a community occurs in the interpersonal domain, and personally, an individual gains insight by identifying themselves with the narrative of another person (Chelf, Deshler, Hiltman, & Durnazo-Arvizu, 2000). Telling stories is considered a natural human impulse (White, 1981) and a primary way of making sense of an experience (Mishler, 1986). According to Chamberlain et al., (1997) when people create meaning from an experience often organize encounters into coherent stories. Highlights of using storytelling as a research methodology will be explained and an example provided of using storytelling as a research methodology with pediatric burn patients will be presented. This is a very creative and new way of doing research with vulnerable populations and was proven to add tremendous insight to the research process.

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